2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159091
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Graduate Nurse Perceptions of the Work Environment and Job Satisfaction
Abstract:
Graduate Nurse Perceptions of the Work Environment and Job Satisfaction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Halfer, Diana, MSN, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Memorial Hospital
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:Clinical and Organizational Development, Mailstop 47, 2300 Children's Plaza, Chicago, IL, 60614, USA
Contact Telephone:773-880-4511
Co-Authors:Elaine Graf, PhD, MSN, PNP, Research Coordinator
The purpose of this longitudinal research study is to describe new
graduate nurse perceptions of the work environment and job satisfaction in
the first eighteen months of employment at a Magnet designated Midwestern
urban academic pediatric medical center. The theoretical framework for the
study was drawn from Marlene Kramer's classic research on "reality shock,"
job satisfaction and organizational commitment and Magnet hospital
research. The sample size consisted of 84 new graduate nurses hired over
one year. Data collection began in September 2001 and concluded in March
2004. The study tool was developed by the authors and was comprised of
demographic fill-in- blanks, a Likert-type scale seeking degree of
agreement for 21 statements, and four open-ended questions. The survey was
mailed at three, six, 12, and 18 months which corresponded with the new
graduate nurses' time in the job. The return rates varied between 48-76%.
Tool face validity and test-retest reliability measures were determined.
The findings showed that all 21 tool items had a positive means by 18
months of employment and several items had a statistically significant
greater positive mean over time. Findings suggested that the orientation
assisted the new graduates in becoming confident in their clinical
competence and they were satisfied with work environment areas including
understanding leadership expectations, having information to perform the
job effectively, having input used to address unit issues, feeling
professional contributions are valued, feeling respected by physicians and
being able to participate in professional development. Dissatisfaction
with work schedules emerged at 12 months but later improved by 18 months.
The findings suggest that the new graduate nurse's career adjustment
extends beyond mastering clinical skills and includes a lifestyle
adjustment. Nursing leaders can support new graduates with mentoring
strategies and scheduling policies that give nurses hope for improving
life-work balance. Longitudinal satisfaction studies help nursing leaders
pinpoint sources of professional fulfillment and frustration and make
decisions to improve new nurse job and career satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGraduate Nurse Perceptions of the Work Environment and Job Satisfactionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159091-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Graduate Nurse Perceptions of the Work Environment and Job Satisfaction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Halfer, Diana, MSN, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Memorial Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Clinical and Organizational Development, Mailstop 47, 2300 Children's Plaza, Chicago, IL, 60614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">773-880-4511</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dhalfer@childrensmemorial.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elaine Graf, PhD, MSN, PNP, Research Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this longitudinal research study is to describe new <br/> graduate nurse perceptions of the work environment and job satisfaction in <br/> the first eighteen months of employment at a Magnet designated Midwestern <br/> urban academic pediatric medical center. The theoretical framework for the <br/> study was drawn from Marlene Kramer's classic research on &quot;reality shock,&quot; <br/> job satisfaction and organizational commitment and Magnet hospital <br/> research. The sample size consisted of 84 new graduate nurses hired over <br/> one year. Data collection began in September 2001 and concluded in March <br/> 2004. The study tool was developed by the authors and was comprised of <br/> demographic fill-in- blanks, a Likert-type scale seeking degree of <br/> agreement for 21 statements, and four open-ended questions. The survey was <br/> mailed at three, six, 12, and 18 months which corresponded with the new <br/> graduate nurses' time in the job. The return rates varied between 48-76%. <br/> Tool face validity and test-retest reliability measures were determined. <br/> The findings showed that all 21 tool items had a positive means by 18 <br/> months of employment and several items had a statistically significant <br/> greater positive mean over time. Findings suggested that the orientation <br/> assisted the new graduates in becoming confident in their clinical <br/> competence and they were satisfied with work environment areas including <br/> understanding leadership expectations, having information to perform the <br/> job effectively, having input used to address unit issues, feeling <br/> professional contributions are valued, feeling respected by physicians and <br/> being able to participate in professional development. Dissatisfaction <br/> with work schedules emerged at 12 months but later improved by 18 months. <br/> The findings suggest that the new graduate nurse's career adjustment <br/> extends beyond mastering clinical skills and includes a lifestyle <br/> adjustment. Nursing leaders can support new graduates with mentoring <br/> strategies and scheduling policies that give nurses hope for improving <br/> life-work balance. Longitudinal satisfaction studies help nursing leaders <br/> pinpoint sources of professional fulfillment and frustration and make <br/> decisions to improve new nurse job and career satisfaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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