Age Differences in Quality of Life, Self-Efficacy, Current Concerns, Symptom Distress, and Appraisal of Illness/Caregiving in Couples Facing Prostate Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159092
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age Differences in Quality of Life, Self-Efficacy, Current Concerns, Symptom Distress, and Appraisal of Illness/Caregiving in Couples Facing Prostate Cancer
Abstract:
Age Differences in Quality of Life, Self-Efficacy, Current Concerns, Symptom Distress, and Appraisal of Illness/Caregiving in Couples Facing Prostate Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Harden, Janet, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Ave, Room 10 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313-577-3341
Co-Authors:Laurel L. Northouse, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Bernadine Cimprich, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Joanne Pohl, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean; Jersey Liang, PhD, Professor; and Trace Kershaw, PhD, Assistant Professor
Although prostate cancer is prevalent, little information is available
on how it affects patients' and partners' quality of life according to
their age cohort. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to determine
if the quality of life (QOL) of men with prostate cancer and their
partners differs according to age cohort: 50-64 (young old); 65-74 (middle
old); and 75 and above (old old), and 2) to determine if patients' and
partners' self-efficacy, current stressors, symptom distress and appraisal
of illness differs according to age cohort. McCubbin and McCubbin's Family
Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation Framework (1993) guided this study; it
focuses on the additive effect of normative (developmental stage) and
non-normative stressors (illness) on the couple's ability to adapt. A
descriptive design was used to compare data obtained from 69 patients and
their partners (n=23 dyads per age cohort) using secondary data from an
intervention study. Data was obtained from baseline assessments using
multiple standardized instruments with adequate reliability and validity.
ANOVA and MANOVA was used to determine differences among age groups.
Findings indicated that patients in the middle group (65-74) had a better
physical and mental QOL and higher self-efficacy than the younger group;
they also had less negative appraisal of illness than the other age
groups. Partners in the middle group perceived less bother with hormonal
symptoms than the other groups. Partners in the youngest age group
reported the most disturbances with sexual changes in their husbands.
Implications suggest that interventions may need to be tailored to
couples' developmental stage.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge Differences in Quality of Life, Self-Efficacy, Current Concerns, Symptom Distress, and Appraisal of Illness/Caregiving in Couples Facing Prostate Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159092-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Age Differences in Quality of Life, Self-Efficacy, Current Concerns, Symptom Distress, and Appraisal of Illness/Caregiving in Couples Facing Prostate Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harden, Janet, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Ave, Room 10 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-577-3341</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jharden@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laurel L. Northouse, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Bernadine Cimprich, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Joanne Pohl, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean; Jersey Liang, PhD, Professor; and Trace Kershaw, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although prostate cancer is prevalent, little information is available <br/> on how it affects patients' and partners' quality of life according to <br/> their age cohort. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to determine <br/> if the quality of life (QOL) of men with prostate cancer and their <br/> partners differs according to age cohort: 50-64 (young old); 65-74 (middle <br/> old); and 75 and above (old old), and 2) to determine if patients' and <br/> partners' self-efficacy, current stressors, symptom distress and appraisal <br/> of illness differs according to age cohort. McCubbin and McCubbin's Family <br/> Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation Framework (1993) guided this study; it <br/> focuses on the additive effect of normative (developmental stage) and <br/> non-normative stressors (illness) on the couple's ability to adapt. A <br/> descriptive design was used to compare data obtained from 69 patients and <br/> their partners (n=23 dyads per age cohort) using secondary data from an <br/> intervention study. Data was obtained from baseline assessments using <br/> multiple standardized instruments with adequate reliability and validity. <br/> ANOVA and MANOVA was used to determine differences among age groups. <br/> Findings indicated that patients in the middle group (65-74) had a better <br/> physical and mental QOL and higher self-efficacy than the younger group; <br/> they also had less negative appraisal of illness than the other age <br/> groups. Partners in the middle group perceived less bother with hormonal <br/> symptoms than the other groups. Partners in the youngest age group <br/> reported the most disturbances with sexual changes in their husbands. <br/> Implications suggest that interventions may need to be tailored to <br/> couples' developmental stage.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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