2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159093
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implicit Memory in Dementia
Abstract:
Implicit Memory in Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Harrison, Barbara, PhD, RN, GNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 4001 W. McNichols, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA
Contact Telephone:313-993-1935
Co-Authors:Gwi-Ryung Son, PhD, RN, Research Analyst; and Ann Whall, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Millions of people will develop dementia in the next decade (Wimo,
2003) and providing quality nursing care will be challenging. Models for
dementia nursing care have focused on the well documented explicit memory
deficit (e.g., inability to identify time/place/person) in dementia.
However, implicit memory (IM) (e.g. unconscious procedural or priming
memory) has not been addressed. A growing body of research supports the
maintenance of IM (Lustig & Buckner, 2004) in the presence of impaired
explicit memory among all stages of dementia. Despite mounting evidence
for sparing of IM in dementia, it is an unexplored area in nursing theory
development. Therefore, this poster describes the first nursing model
focusing on Implicit Memory in Dementia (IMD) and the research supporting
it. Implicit memory (IM) involves unconscious memory processes resulting from
prior experience with a task or item that results in improved performance
(Eldridge, Masterman, Knowlton, 2002). Thus IM is used in activities of
daily living (ADL) skills, determining familiarity, and affective
responses. The Implicit Memory in Dementia (IMD) model posits that when
implicit memory is preserved and/or enhanced, dementia patients' ADL,
behavior, and quality of life can be maintained or improved. This poster
will 1) review research related to the implicit memory system and
dementia, and 2) describe a new model of care, Implicit Memory in
Dementia. Theory development in dementia care brings new perspectives to
the challenges that nurses face in providing competent quality care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplicit Memory in Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159093-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implicit Memory in Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrison, Barbara, PhD, RN, GNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 4001 W. McNichols, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-993-1935</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">harrisbe@udmercy.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gwi-Ryung Son, PhD, RN, Research Analyst; and Ann Whall, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Millions of people will develop dementia in the next decade (Wimo, <br/> 2003) and providing quality nursing care will be challenging. Models for <br/> dementia nursing care have focused on the well documented explicit memory <br/> deficit (e.g., inability to identify time/place/person) in dementia. <br/> However, implicit memory (IM) (e.g. unconscious procedural or priming <br/> memory) has not been addressed. A growing body of research supports the <br/> maintenance of IM (Lustig &amp; Buckner, 2004) in the presence of impaired <br/> explicit memory among all stages of dementia. Despite mounting evidence <br/> for sparing of IM in dementia, it is an unexplored area in nursing theory <br/> development. Therefore, this poster describes the first nursing model <br/> focusing on Implicit Memory in Dementia (IMD) and the research supporting <br/> it. Implicit memory (IM) involves unconscious memory processes resulting from <br/> prior experience with a task or item that results in improved performance <br/> (Eldridge, Masterman, Knowlton, 2002). Thus IM is used in activities of <br/> daily living (ADL) skills, determining familiarity, and affective <br/> responses. The Implicit Memory in Dementia (IMD) model posits that when <br/> implicit memory is preserved and/or enhanced, dementia patients' ADL, <br/> behavior, and quality of life can be maintained or improved. This poster <br/> will 1) review research related to the implicit memory system and <br/> dementia, and 2) describe a new model of care, Implicit Memory in <br/> Dementia. Theory development in dementia care brings new perspectives to <br/> the challenges that nurses face in providing competent quality care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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