Disparities Between Black and White Patients with Cancer Pain: The Effect of Perception of Control Over Pain

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159094
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Disparities Between Black and White Patients with Cancer Pain: The Effect of Perception of Control Over Pain
Abstract:
Disparities Between Black and White Patients with Cancer Pain: The Effect of Perception of Control Over Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hasenau, Susan, PhDc, RN, CNNP - Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Research Assistant
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 34437 Cowan, Westland, MI, 48185, USA
Contact Telephone:734-432-5863
Co-Authors:April Hazard Vallerand, PhD, RN - Primary Investigator and Thomas Templin, PhD, Associate Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of
perception of control over pain on disparities in pain, symptom distress,
and functional status in White and Black patients with cancer. Background:
Pain continues to be a problem in ambulatory patients with cancer.
Disparities in minority patients with pain have been previously
identified. Minorities with cancer have been reported to receive less
preventative care and early detection, decreased access to treatment, less
use of hospice care, and lower survival rates. Methodology: A cross
sectional, descriptive design was used. The sample consisted of 281
patients at an outpatient clinic in large urban cancer centers who
reported having pain within the last month and were receiving treatment in
the cancer center. The outcome measures considered were pain intensity,
pain-related distress, functional status, and perception of control over
pain Results: Black patients had significantly higher pain intensity, more
pain-related distress, and reported more pain-related interference with
function than White patients. Disparities in pain-related distress and
functional status were significantly reduced and only disparities in pain
intensity remained when perception of control over pain was held constant.
Implications: Perception of control over pain is an important factor in
understanding responses to pain. Increasing a patientÆs perception of
control over pain may decrease disparities and increase functional status.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDisparities Between Black and White Patients with Cancer Pain: The Effect of Perception of Control Over Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159094-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Disparities Between Black and White Patients with Cancer Pain: The Effect of Perception of Control Over Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hasenau, Susan, PhDc, RN, CNNP - Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 34437 Cowan, Westland, MI, 48185, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-432-5863</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shasenau@madonna.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">April Hazard Vallerand, PhD, RN - Primary Investigator and Thomas Templin, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of <br/> perception of control over pain on disparities in pain, symptom distress, <br/> and functional status in White and Black patients with cancer. Background: <br/> Pain continues to be a problem in ambulatory patients with cancer. <br/> Disparities in minority patients with pain have been previously <br/> identified. Minorities with cancer have been reported to receive less <br/> preventative care and early detection, decreased access to treatment, less <br/> use of hospice care, and lower survival rates. Methodology: A cross <br/> sectional, descriptive design was used. The sample consisted of 281 <br/> patients at an outpatient clinic in large urban cancer centers who <br/> reported having pain within the last month and were receiving treatment in <br/> the cancer center. The outcome measures considered were pain intensity, <br/> pain-related distress, functional status, and perception of control over <br/> pain Results: Black patients had significantly higher pain intensity, more <br/> pain-related distress, and reported more pain-related interference with <br/> function than White patients. Disparities in pain-related distress and <br/> functional status were significantly reduced and only disparities in pain <br/> intensity remained when perception of control over pain was held constant. <br/> Implications: Perception of control over pain is an important factor in <br/> understanding responses to pain. Increasing a patient&AElig;s perception of <br/> control over pain may decrease disparities and increase functional status.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:41:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:41:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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