2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159096
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Serum Prolactin Levels in Preterm & Term Mothers
Abstract:
Serum Prolactin Levels in Preterm & Term Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hill, Pamela, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Maternal Child Nursing, 1515 5th Avenue, Moline, IL, 61265, USA
Contact Telephone:309-757-9467
Co-Authors:Jean C Aldag, PhD, RN, Professor; Robert T Chatterton, PhD, Professor; and Michael Zinaman, MD, Director
Prolactin is one of two major hormones involved in lactation. Whether
serum basal prolactin levels postpartum are associated with milk
production remains unclear. As part of a larger study, the purpose of this
study was to compare serum prolactin levels in mothers who stimulated
their breasts and examine the associations with milk volume. The Hill-Aldag
Lactation model served as the framework for this study. Using a prospective
repeated measures design the convenience sample from 4 tertiary care
centers in the Midwest consisted of 95 mothers of a non-nursing preterm
infant and 98 mothers of a health term infant. Milk volume was measured as
a liquid in ml as a function of a standardized simultaneous double pumping
routine, or infant test weighing in gms using the BabyWeigh scale for the
first 42 days postpartum. Serum blood samples were obtained continuously
over an 80-minute time period at weeks 2, 4, 6. Prolactin levels were
measured before, during, and after breast stimulation. Basal prolactin
levels were significantly different between the gestation groups for weeks
2, 4, 6. There was only 1 significant difference in prolactin between the
groups during or after breast stimulation. There was a positive
relationship between prolactin levels and milk volume produced only in the
preterm group. This is the first demonstration of a relationship between
prolactin and milk volume in lactating preterm mothers. The failure to
observe a relationship in term mothers may be due to the higher basal
levels of prolactin. The lower levels of prolactin in preterm mothers could
be a partial explanation of the positive associations of prolactin with
milk volume; however, additional work needs to be undertaken to more fully
understand this association. Acknowledgements: This research was funded by
NIH, NINR R01 4994, and Medela Inc.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSerum Prolactin Levels in Preterm & Term Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159096-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Serum Prolactin Levels in Preterm &amp; Term Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hill, Pamela, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Maternal Child Nursing, 1515 5th Avenue, Moline, IL, 61265, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-757-9467</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">phill@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean C Aldag, PhD, RN, Professor; Robert T Chatterton, PhD, Professor; and Michael Zinaman, MD, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Prolactin is one of two major hormones involved in lactation. Whether <br/> serum basal prolactin levels postpartum are associated with milk <br/> production remains unclear. As part of a larger study, the purpose of this <br/> study was to compare serum prolactin levels in mothers who stimulated <br/> their breasts and examine the associations with milk volume. The Hill-Aldag <br/> Lactation model served as the framework for this study. Using a prospective <br/> repeated measures design the convenience sample from 4 tertiary care <br/> centers in the Midwest consisted of 95 mothers of a non-nursing preterm <br/> infant and 98 mothers of a health term infant. Milk volume was measured as <br/> a liquid in ml as a function of a standardized simultaneous double pumping <br/> routine, or infant test weighing in gms using the BabyWeigh scale for the <br/> first 42 days postpartum. Serum blood samples were obtained continuously <br/> over an 80-minute time period at weeks 2, 4, 6. Prolactin levels were <br/> measured before, during, and after breast stimulation. Basal prolactin <br/> levels were significantly different between the gestation groups for weeks <br/> 2, 4, 6. There was only 1 significant difference in prolactin between the <br/> groups during or after breast stimulation. There was a positive <br/> relationship between prolactin levels and milk volume produced only in the <br/> preterm group. This is the first demonstration of a relationship between <br/> prolactin and milk volume in lactating preterm mothers. The failure to <br/> observe a relationship in term mothers may be due to the higher basal <br/> levels of prolactin. The lower levels of prolactin in preterm mothers could <br/> be a partial explanation of the positive associations of prolactin with <br/> milk volume; however, additional work needs to be undertaken to more fully <br/> understand this association. Acknowledgements: This research was funded by <br/> NIH, NINR R01 4994, and Medela Inc.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:42:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:42:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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