2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159097
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Activities of Daily Living in (N=18) Hospitalized Elderly
Abstract:
Activities of Daily Living in (N=18) Hospitalized Elderly
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Holm, Karyn, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:DePaul University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 990 West Fullerton, Suite 3000, Chicago, IL, 60614, USA
Contact Telephone:773 325 7280
Co-Authors:Mark Foreman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Jeannine Forrest, PhD, RN, Project Director; Myoung Sook Kwon, PhD, RN, Post Doctoral Fellow; and Lori Willis, BS, Project Coordinator
In elderly men and women, the effects of an acute hospitalization,
compounded by limitations associated with aging and the coexistence of
age-related chronic disease threaten functional independence. Conceptual
Framework: Functional autonomy, defined as the ability to engage in
activities of daily living independently without assistance provided the
conceptualization for the study. Purpose: Within the context of an ongoing
study of hospitalization in the elderly, the purpose of this presentation
is to describe activities of daily living throughout the hospitalization
experience in elderly men and women. Subjects: Subjects were 18 elderly
men and women (7 male; 11 female) ranging in age from 65-91 years
(mean=72.83; standard deviation=8.20). Methods: Following a description of
the study and requirements of participation, opportunities were provided
to reinforce expectations and ask questions. Following informed consent
baseline measures of activities of daily living were initiated and
repeated daily throughout hospitalization. Results: Of those admitted once
during this time period (n=17) one an 82 year old Hispanic male
experienced change in two basic activities of daily living (bathing and
toileting), moving from independence to dependence, thus in need of
assistance. The 18th patient, a 66 year old African-American female
sustained four admissions and began experiencing change in activities of
daily living ability (moving from the bed to a chair; walking) with the
second admission, lasting 24 days, changes which persisted to the fourth
admission. Conclusions: In two of the 18 hospitalized elderly, activities
of daily living ability declined with hospitalization. Nurses caring for
elderly patients are in a pivotal position to assess activities of daily
living ability throughout hospitalization and to further develop an
ongoing awareness of those who may be particularly vulnerable to decline
in activities of daily living ability. **This project was supported by an
American Academy of Nursing/John A. Hartford Foundation Initiative
Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Fellowship awarded to Dr.
Holm/Dr. Foreman, Sponsor.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleActivities of Daily Living in (N=18) Hospitalized Elderlyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159097-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Activities of Daily Living in (N=18) Hospitalized Elderly</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holm, Karyn, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">DePaul University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 990 West Fullerton, Suite 3000, Chicago, IL, 60614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">773 325 7280</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kholm1@depaul.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mark Foreman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Jeannine Forrest, PhD, RN, Project Director; Myoung Sook Kwon, PhD, RN, Post Doctoral Fellow; and Lori Willis, BS, Project Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In elderly men and women, the effects of an acute hospitalization, <br/> compounded by limitations associated with aging and the coexistence of <br/> age-related chronic disease threaten functional independence. Conceptual <br/> Framework: Functional autonomy, defined as the ability to engage in <br/> activities of daily living independently without assistance provided the <br/> conceptualization for the study. Purpose: Within the context of an ongoing <br/> study of hospitalization in the elderly, the purpose of this presentation <br/> is to describe activities of daily living throughout the hospitalization <br/> experience in elderly men and women. Subjects: Subjects were 18 elderly <br/> men and women (7 male; 11 female) ranging in age from 65-91 years <br/> (mean=72.83; standard deviation=8.20). Methods: Following a description of <br/> the study and requirements of participation, opportunities were provided <br/> to reinforce expectations and ask questions. Following informed consent <br/> baseline measures of activities of daily living were initiated and <br/> repeated daily throughout hospitalization. Results: Of those admitted once <br/> during this time period (n=17) one an 82 year old Hispanic male <br/> experienced change in two basic activities of daily living (bathing and <br/> toileting), moving from independence to dependence, thus in need of <br/> assistance. The 18th patient, a 66 year old African-American female <br/> sustained four admissions and began experiencing change in activities of <br/> daily living ability (moving from the bed to a chair; walking) with the <br/> second admission, lasting 24 days, changes which persisted to the fourth <br/> admission. Conclusions: In two of the 18 hospitalized elderly, activities <br/> of daily living ability declined with hospitalization. Nurses caring for <br/> elderly patients are in a pivotal position to assess activities of daily <br/> living ability throughout hospitalization and to further develop an <br/> ongoing awareness of those who may be particularly vulnerable to decline <br/> in activities of daily living ability. **This project was supported by an <br/> American Academy of Nursing/John A. Hartford Foundation Initiative <br/> Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Fellowship awarded to Dr. <br/> Holm/Dr. Foreman, Sponsor.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:42:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:42:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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