Relating Serotonin Transporter and Receptor Gene Variants and Clinical Phenotype in Alzheimer's Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159098
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relating Serotonin Transporter and Receptor Gene Variants and Clinical Phenotype in Alzheimer's Disease
Abstract:
Relating Serotonin Transporter and Receptor Gene Variants and Clinical Phenotype in Alzheimer's Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Holston, Ezra, PhD, MSN, RN, PNP
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Iowa
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 305 Nursing Building, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-7062
Co-Authors:Debra Schutte, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Susan DeCranes, PhDc, Kathryn L. Flanders, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; Anne D. Letocha, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; Kathryn Hemerson, BSN; and Elizabeth Forest, Research Assistant
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an increasingly prevalent neurologic
disorder characterized by progressive impairment in cognition, behavior,
functioning, and global presentation. Evidence suggests that these
impairments are associated with changes in the limbic system's
electrophysiology and neuropathology. Changes have been specifically
associated with serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the limbic system.
Minimal information is known about the contribution of serotonin gene
variants to the development and progression of AD's phenotype.
The purpose of this pilot study is to describe the relationship between
serotonin transporter and receptor gene variants and clinical phenotype in
persons with advanced AD.
A longitudinal, descriptive study design was used. Thirty-seven subjects
diagnosed with probable AD were recruited from five long-term care
facilities. Whole blood or cheek cells were collected for DNA extraction
and genotyping. Measures of behavioral features (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation
Inventory, Neuropsychiatric Inventory), cognitive status (Global
Deterioration Scale, Severe Impairment Battery), and functional skills
(Functional Abilities Checklist) were collected at four-month intervals
over one year.
Subjects had a baseline mean age of 85.5 years (onset mean age of 77.1
years) and moderate to severe impairment in cognition, behavior, and
functioning. Subjects were genotyped for the variants in the serotonin
transporter and receptor. Statistical analyses are underway to
characterize the clinical phenotype across multiple time points. Survival
analysis will be used to compare genotype groups according to age at
onset. Repeated measures MANCOVA will be used to compute the relationship
between genotypes and clinical phenotype over time.
Results from this pilot study will contribute to the development of a
larger study examining the relationship between genetic variants,
electrophysiological changes, and clinical phenotype of persons with AD.
More importantly, these results can contribute to nurses' incorporation of
genetic information into the care of persons with AD through
evidence-based practice for positive outcomes and improved health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelating Serotonin Transporter and Receptor Gene Variants and Clinical Phenotype in Alzheimer's Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159098-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relating Serotonin Transporter and Receptor Gene Variants and Clinical Phenotype in Alzheimer's Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holston, Ezra, PhD, MSN, RN, PNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 305 Nursing Building, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-7062</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ezra-holston@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debra Schutte, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Susan DeCranes, PhDc, Kathryn L. Flanders, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; Anne D. Letocha, MSN, APRN, Predoctoral Student; Kathryn Hemerson, BSN; and Elizabeth Forest, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an increasingly prevalent neurologic <br/> disorder characterized by progressive impairment in cognition, behavior, <br/> functioning, and global presentation. Evidence suggests that these <br/> impairments are associated with changes in the limbic system's <br/> electrophysiology and neuropathology. Changes have been specifically <br/> associated with serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the limbic system. <br/> Minimal information is known about the contribution of serotonin gene <br/> variants to the development and progression of AD's phenotype. <br/> The purpose of this pilot study is to describe the relationship between <br/> serotonin transporter and receptor gene variants and clinical phenotype in <br/> persons with advanced AD. <br/> A longitudinal, descriptive study design was used. Thirty-seven subjects <br/> diagnosed with probable AD were recruited from five long-term care <br/> facilities. Whole blood or cheek cells were collected for DNA extraction <br/> and genotyping. Measures of behavioral features (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation <br/> Inventory, Neuropsychiatric Inventory), cognitive status (Global <br/> Deterioration Scale, Severe Impairment Battery), and functional skills <br/> (Functional Abilities Checklist) were collected at four-month intervals <br/> over one year. <br/> Subjects had a baseline mean age of 85.5 years (onset mean age of 77.1 <br/> years) and moderate to severe impairment in cognition, behavior, and <br/> functioning. Subjects were genotyped for the variants in the serotonin <br/> transporter and receptor. Statistical analyses are underway to <br/> characterize the clinical phenotype across multiple time points. Survival <br/> analysis will be used to compare genotype groups according to age at <br/> onset. Repeated measures MANCOVA will be used to compute the relationship <br/> between genotypes and clinical phenotype over time. <br/> Results from this pilot study will contribute to the development of a <br/> larger study examining the relationship between genetic variants, <br/> electrophysiological changes, and clinical phenotype of persons with AD. <br/> More importantly, these results can contribute to nurses' incorporation of <br/> genetic information into the care of persons with AD through <br/> evidence-based practice for positive outcomes and improved health care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:42:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:42:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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