2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159102
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attentional Demands and Daily Functioning among Community-Dwelling Elders
Abstract:
Attentional Demands and Daily Functioning among Community-Dwelling Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Jansen, Debra, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Adult Health Nursing, 105 Garfield Avenue, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA
Contact Telephone:715-836-5183
Everyday life is full of numerous demands for attention that can affect the ability to function. For older people, examples of these attentional demands include physical discomforts, managing transportation, and worries. As described in relation to the Kaplan Attention Restoration Theory, attentional demands are factors that can overwhelm and fatigue the neural mechanisms responsible for cognitive processes, including directed attention, a type of selective attention necessary for concentration. When attentional demands impair the ability to use directed attention, people have difficulty focusing on complex tasks, carrying out plans, making decisions, remembering, and generally managing the daily routines of life. Little research exists regarding the effects of attentional demands on older people's abilities to carry out common daily activities requiring directed attention. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between attentional demands and the ability to manage daily life activities for a convenience sample of 54 community-dwelling elders (34 women, 20 men; ages 65-87 years, M=75.7 years). The Attentional Demands Survey, a 42-item Likert-type scale instrument, was used to measure four domains of attentional demands: Physical-environmental, informational, behavioral, and affective. The Attentional Function Index, a 16-item visual analogue scale instrument, was used to assess daily functioning performance on common activities requiring directed attention. As theorized, attentional demands correlated (r=-.58) significantly with the elders' perceptions of their performance on activities: Elders who experienced more attentional demands perceived themselves as having greater difficulty managing day-to-day tasks requiring directed attention. Attentional demands accounted for a significant proportion of variance in functioning (12%), even after partially out the effects of depressive symptoms and health. These findings provide support for the theorized relationship between attentional demands and daily functioning, and nursing interventions aimed at decreasing attentional demands in order to promote effective functioning and well-being for older people.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttentional Demands and Daily Functioning among Community-Dwelling Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159102-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attentional Demands and Daily Functioning among Community-Dwelling Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jansen, Debra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health Nursing, 105 Garfield Avenue, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">715-836-5183</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Jansenda@uwec.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Everyday life is full of numerous demands for attention that can affect the ability to function. For older people, examples of these attentional demands include physical discomforts, managing transportation, and worries. As described in relation to the Kaplan Attention Restoration Theory, attentional demands are factors that can overwhelm and fatigue the neural mechanisms responsible for cognitive processes, including directed attention, a type of selective attention necessary for concentration. When attentional demands impair the ability to use directed attention, people have difficulty focusing on complex tasks, carrying out plans, making decisions, remembering, and generally managing the daily routines of life. Little research exists regarding the effects of attentional demands on older people's abilities to carry out common daily activities requiring directed attention. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between attentional demands and the ability to manage daily life activities for a convenience sample of 54 community-dwelling elders (34 women, 20 men; ages 65-87 years, M=75.7 years). The Attentional Demands Survey, a 42-item Likert-type scale instrument, was used to measure four domains of attentional demands: Physical-environmental, informational, behavioral, and affective. The Attentional Function Index, a 16-item visual analogue scale instrument, was used to assess daily functioning performance on common activities requiring directed attention. As theorized, attentional demands correlated (r=-.58) significantly with the elders' perceptions of their performance on activities: Elders who experienced more attentional demands perceived themselves as having greater difficulty managing day-to-day tasks requiring directed attention. Attentional demands accounted for a significant proportion of variance in functioning (12%), even after partially out the effects of depressive symptoms and health. These findings provide support for the theorized relationship between attentional demands and daily functioning, and nursing interventions aimed at decreasing attentional demands in order to promote effective functioning and well-being for older people.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:42:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:42:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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