Community Leaders' Perceptions of the Needs, Concerns, and Social Support of Single, Low-Income Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159105
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Leaders' Perceptions of the Needs, Concerns, and Social Support of Single, Low-Income Mothers
Author(s):
Keating-Lefler, Rebecca; Brage Hudson, Diane; Campbell-Grossman, Christie; Ofe Fleck, Margaret; Westfall, Joan
Author Details:
Rebecca Keating-Lefler, PhD, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor, College of Nursing Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: rkeating@unmc.edu; Diane Brage Hudson, PhD, MSN, BSN, Associate Professor; Christie Campbell-Grossman, PhD, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor; Margaret Ofe Fleck, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor; and Joan Westfall, PhD, MSN, BSN, Associate Professor
Abstract:
Purpose: To assess and describe the needs and concerns of single, low-income mothers during their transition to parenthood from the perspective of community leaders working closely with the families. A second purpose was to evaluate social support mechanisms that are available for the families.

Design: Qualitative using focus group methodology.

Participants: Two groups of community leaders (n=16) who work with single, low-income mothers on a one to one basis, and on a program administrative level.

Methods: Focus groups were conducted with two groups of community leaders. Discussion data were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The process of word and content interpretation was completed using a combination of qualitative data analysis techniques.

Results: Three major themes with sub-themes emerged from the data. Theme I social support issues included the sub-themes of emotional support, tangible support, informational support, appraisal support, and positive and negative support. Theme II, personal barriers to success consisted of the sub-themes stress, fear of parenthood, low self-esteem, isolation, and inadequate parenting competence. Theme III, system barriers comprised two subthemes: fear of the system and insensitive and ineffective services.

Conclusions: Community leaders expressed concerns that single, low-income mothers lack adequate social support and social connections that strongly influence their ability to avoid risks to their health and well-being as well as the health and well-being of their infants. Few single, low-income women receive health care interventions past four weeks post-partum.
Findings indicate these women lack adequate social support, experience multiple personal barriers to parenting success, struggle with system barriers, and are at high risk for adverse physical and emotional health. Significant evidence indicates the need for nurses to develop assessments and interventions to evaluate and assist this vulnerable population throughout their infant's first year of life and beyond.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Host:
Midwest Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Leaders' Perceptions of the Needs, Concerns, and Social Support of Single, Low-Income Mothersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeating-Lefler, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrage Hudson, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorCampbell-Grossman, Christieen_US
dc.contributor.authorOfe Fleck, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorWestfall, Joanen_US
dc.author.detailsRebecca Keating-Lefler, PhD, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor, College of Nursing Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: rkeating@unmc.edu; Diane Brage Hudson, PhD, MSN, BSN, Associate Professor; Christie Campbell-Grossman, PhD, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor; Margaret Ofe Fleck, MSN, BSN, Assistant Professor; and Joan Westfall, PhD, MSN, BSN, Associate Professoren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159105-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess and describe the needs and concerns of single, low-income mothers during their transition to parenthood from the perspective of community leaders working closely with the families. A second purpose was to evaluate social support mechanisms that are available for the families.<br /><br />Design: Qualitative using focus group methodology.<br /><br />Participants: Two groups of community leaders (n=16) who work with single, low-income mothers on a one to one basis, and on a program administrative level.<br /><br />Methods: Focus groups were conducted with two groups of community leaders. Discussion data were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The process of word and content interpretation was completed using a combination of qualitative data analysis techniques.<br /><br />Results: Three major themes with sub-themes emerged from the data. Theme I social support issues included the sub-themes of emotional support, tangible support, informational support, appraisal support, and positive and negative support. Theme II, personal barriers to success consisted of the sub-themes stress, fear of parenthood, low self-esteem, isolation, and inadequate parenting competence. Theme III, system barriers comprised two subthemes: fear of the system and insensitive and ineffective services. <br /><br />Conclusions: Community leaders expressed concerns that single, low-income mothers lack adequate social support and social connections that strongly influence their ability to avoid risks to their health and well-being as well as the health and well-being of their infants. Few single, low-income women receive health care interventions past four weeks post-partum.<br /> Findings indicate these women lack adequate social support, experience multiple personal barriers to parenting success, struggle with system barriers, and are at high risk for adverse physical and emotional health. Significant evidence indicates the need for nurses to develop assessments and interventions to evaluate and assist this vulnerable population throughout their infant's first year of life and beyond.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:42:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:42:33Z-
dc.conference.date2005-
dc.conference.hostMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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