2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159107
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Simulations for Documentation System Fluency Using the Omaha System
Abstract:
Simulations for Documentation System Fluency Using the Omaha System
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kerr, Madeleine, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612-625-2669
Co-Authors:Karen A. Monsen, MS, RN, Predoctoral Student and Karen S. Martin, MSN, RN
Purpose: The purpose of this formative research was to develop and
evaluate experiences to build BSN student skill in documentation system
fluency and report literacy.
Background: This project was consistent with one of the population-based
competencies for the new graduate public health nurse developed by the
regional education-practice consortium. The Omaha System was selected
because most counties in this region use Omaha System-based automated
systems for nursing documentation. Social cognitive theory provided the
foundation for development of the teaching/learning methodology.
Methodology: Senior BSN students (n=120) participated in an online module
applying the Omaha System to three home visit simulations. Using an
innovative Omaha System interactive tool, students documented their
observations of client problems, nursing interventions and client outcomes
(knowledge, behavior, and status). Students printed their documentation in
preparation for classroom activities in which they compared their
documentation with "expert" nurses' responses to the same case studies. A
subset of 10 students also had a practicum experience with public health
nurses in which they practiced Omaha System documentation with case study
simulations prior to documenting a shared home visit. Aggregate shared
home visit data were analyzed and reported in a classroom lecture. Student
confidence logs were used as an intermediate outcome measure of student
learning.
Results: Students who participated in the online module improved their
confidence in using the Omaha System to a mean of 3.65, whereas students
with the additional practicum experience reached a confidence level of 4.1
(1=not at all to 5=extremely confident).
Implications: An online simulation experience can promote student
competence when practicum resources are not uniformly available.
Additional guided practice with public health nurses yields higher student
confidence levels than online simulation experience alone. Next,
developers will revise the online and practicum experiences using student
focus group data and recently published Omaha System revisions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSimulations for Documentation System Fluency Using the Omaha Systemen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159107-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Simulations for Documentation System Fluency Using the Omaha System</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kerr, Madeleine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-625-2669</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kerrx010@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen A. Monsen, MS, RN, Predoctoral Student and Karen S. Martin, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this formative research was to develop and <br/> evaluate experiences to build BSN student skill in documentation system <br/> fluency and report literacy. <br/> Background: This project was consistent with one of the population-based <br/> competencies for the new graduate public health nurse developed by the <br/> regional education-practice consortium. The Omaha System was selected <br/> because most counties in this region use Omaha System-based automated <br/> systems for nursing documentation. Social cognitive theory provided the <br/> foundation for development of the teaching/learning methodology.<br/> Methodology: Senior BSN students (n=120) participated in an online module <br/> applying the Omaha System to three home visit simulations. Using an <br/> innovative Omaha System interactive tool, students documented their <br/> observations of client problems, nursing interventions and client outcomes <br/> (knowledge, behavior, and status). Students printed their documentation in <br/> preparation for classroom activities in which they compared their <br/> documentation with &quot;expert&quot; nurses' responses to the same case studies. A <br/> subset of 10 students also had a practicum experience with public health <br/> nurses in which they practiced Omaha System documentation with case study <br/> simulations prior to documenting a shared home visit. Aggregate shared <br/> home visit data were analyzed and reported in a classroom lecture. Student <br/> confidence logs were used as an intermediate outcome measure of student <br/> learning.<br/> Results: Students who participated in the online module improved their <br/> confidence in using the Omaha System to a mean of 3.65, whereas students <br/> with the additional practicum experience reached a confidence level of 4.1 <br/> (1=not at all to 5=extremely confident). <br/> Implications: An online simulation experience can promote student <br/> competence when practicum resources are not uniformly available. <br/> Additional guided practice with public health nurses yields higher student <br/> confidence levels than online simulation experience alone. Next, <br/> developers will revise the online and practicum experiences using student <br/> focus group data and recently published Omaha System revisions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:42:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:42:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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