2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159110
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Vigilance
Abstract:
Perceptions of Vigilance
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kooken, Wendy, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Bradley University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 2403 N. Ellory Rd, Peoria, IL, 61615, USA
Contact Telephone:309-677-3704
Vigilance is a poorly defined and rarely researched phenomenon in the
literature. Despite this, vigilance is recommended as the solution to many
problems such as symptom recognition and patient safety. Vigilance is
defined as a variable state of knowledgeable watchfulness, which is
responsive to perceived, actual, and potential threats. Vigilance is
influenced by dynamic states, as well as by psychological and
physiological variables. The use of vigilance is essential for optimal
decision-making strategies, which influence outcomes. Threats of infection
and other complications associated with an immunocompromised state require
a high level of vigilance. Cancer patients, at risk for neutropenia (CPNs)
are particularly susceptible to infectious processes. Up to 40% of CPNs
develop infections which progress to life-threatening sepsis. Of those
cancer patients that develop sepsis, the mortality rate is high, from 50
to 80% depending on the type of cancer. The purpose of this research is to
investigate the vigilance process from the perspective of adult CPNs,
their families, and their healthcare providers. A qualitative,
phenomenological pilot study will be conducted to explore perceptions of
vigilance through interviews with triads (N=7-10) consisting of a CPN, one
of the CPNs family members, and one of nurses working with the CPN and
their family. Analysis will be done using Colaizzi's approach for each
group separately and comparisons of themes will be done via matrix
analysis. Literature has indicated that patients, families of patients,
and healthcare providers experience vigilance differently from one
another. To understand vigilance from a multidimensional perspective, the
input from each of these participants is imperative. How vigilance may be
used by CPNs, their families, and healthcare providers, to resolve issues
such as patient safety and improve self care abilities will be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Vigilanceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159110-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of Vigilance</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kooken, Wendy, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bradley University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 2403 N. Ellory Rd, Peoria, IL, 61615, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-677-3704</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wkooken@bradley.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Vigilance is a poorly defined and rarely researched phenomenon in the <br/> literature. Despite this, vigilance is recommended as the solution to many <br/> problems such as symptom recognition and patient safety. Vigilance is <br/> defined as a variable state of knowledgeable watchfulness, which is <br/> responsive to perceived, actual, and potential threats. Vigilance is <br/> influenced by dynamic states, as well as by psychological and <br/> physiological variables. The use of vigilance is essential for optimal <br/> decision-making strategies, which influence outcomes. Threats of infection <br/> and other complications associated with an immunocompromised state require <br/> a high level of vigilance. Cancer patients, at risk for neutropenia (CPNs) <br/> are particularly susceptible to infectious processes. Up to 40% of CPNs <br/> develop infections which progress to life-threatening sepsis. Of those <br/> cancer patients that develop sepsis, the mortality rate is high, from 50 <br/> to 80% depending on the type of cancer. The purpose of this research is to <br/> investigate the vigilance process from the perspective of adult CPNs, <br/> their families, and their healthcare providers. A qualitative, <br/> phenomenological pilot study will be conducted to explore perceptions of <br/> vigilance through interviews with triads (N=7-10) consisting of a CPN, one <br/> of the CPNs family members, and one of nurses working with the CPN and <br/> their family. Analysis will be done using Colaizzi's approach for each <br/> group separately and comparisons of themes will be done via matrix <br/> analysis. Literature has indicated that patients, families of patients, <br/> and healthcare providers experience vigilance differently from one <br/> another. To understand vigilance from a multidimensional perspective, the <br/> input from each of these participants is imperative. How vigilance may be <br/> used by CPNs, their families, and healthcare providers, to resolve issues <br/> such as patient safety and improve self care abilities will be explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:42:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:42:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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