2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159111
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescents' Perspectives on the Ideal Sexual Health Program
Abstract:
Adolescents' Perspectives on the Ideal Sexual Health Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kovar, Cheryl, MSN, RN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:(614) 247-8439
Co-Authors:Victoria Von Sadovszky, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Molly Dunn, BSN, RN, Research Assistant; and Carolyn J. Brown, MS, CFNP, Project Director
Purpose: To examine what an ideal sexual health education program
would contain according to late adolescents and young adults. Theoretical
framework: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are at pandemic
proportions among adolescents and young adults. Since many STIs are
incurable or becoming antibiotic resistant, promotion of safer sexual
practices is paramount. Most of our educational programs to promote safer
sexual practices fail on major outcome variables within 3 months. The
ultimate purpose of this program of research is to maintain a sustained
effect of condom use and safer sexual practices. Using Johnson's theory of
self-regulation, the perspective of the individuals as to the types of
information they wish to receive, must be taken into consideration.
Subjects: Sixty participants (18 û 28 yrs., M=22.2, SD=2.7) from a large
Midwestern university completed an open-ended interview and questionnaire
about sexual health habits. The majority of participants were female (85%)
and Caucasian (78%). Methods: Qualitative data were collected using four
open-ended questions in a structured interview. Demographic data,
including sexual risk behaviors, were also collected using a closed-ended
survey which the participants filled out privately after their interview.
Responses to open-ended questions were content analyzed using a procedure
by McLaughlin & Marascuilo (1990). Closed-ended responses from the survey
were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Major themes about
the types of information desired included facts about STIs, prevention,
and contraception. The best ways to receive this information were a
relaxed, comfortable environment, peers, and anonymous sources. The length
of programs elicited a range of responses from 1 day to 1 year. In regards
to follow-up programs, mixed results were discovered, however overarching
themes of having confidential resources in which to obtain condoms and ask
questions were found. Conclusions: Results can help practitioners tailor
current education programs to the needs of this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescents' Perspectives on the Ideal Sexual Health Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159111-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescents' Perspectives on the Ideal Sexual Health Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kovar, Cheryl, MSN, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(614) 247-8439</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kovar.7@osu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Victoria Von Sadovszky, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Molly Dunn, BSN, RN, Research Assistant; and Carolyn J. Brown, MS, CFNP, Project Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To examine what an ideal sexual health education program <br/> would contain according to late adolescents and young adults. Theoretical <br/> framework: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are at pandemic <br/> proportions among adolescents and young adults. Since many STIs are <br/> incurable or becoming antibiotic resistant, promotion of safer sexual <br/> practices is paramount. Most of our educational programs to promote safer <br/> sexual practices fail on major outcome variables within 3 months. The <br/> ultimate purpose of this program of research is to maintain a sustained <br/> effect of condom use and safer sexual practices. Using Johnson's theory of <br/> self-regulation, the perspective of the individuals as to the types of <br/> information they wish to receive, must be taken into consideration. <br/> Subjects: Sixty participants (18 &ucirc; 28 yrs., M=22.2, SD=2.7) from a large <br/> Midwestern university completed an open-ended interview and questionnaire <br/> about sexual health habits. The majority of participants were female (85%) <br/> and Caucasian (78%). Methods: Qualitative data were collected using four <br/> open-ended questions in a structured interview. Demographic data, <br/> including sexual risk behaviors, were also collected using a closed-ended <br/> survey which the participants filled out privately after their interview. <br/> Responses to open-ended questions were content analyzed using a procedure <br/> by McLaughlin &amp; Marascuilo (1990). Closed-ended responses from the survey <br/> were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Major themes about <br/> the types of information desired included facts about STIs, prevention, <br/> and contraception. The best ways to receive this information were a <br/> relaxed, comfortable environment, peers, and anonymous sources. The length <br/> of programs elicited a range of responses from 1 day to 1 year. In regards <br/> to follow-up programs, mixed results were discovered, however overarching <br/> themes of having confidential resources in which to obtain condoms and ask <br/> questions were found. Conclusions: Results can help practitioners tailor <br/> current education programs to the needs of this population.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:42:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:42:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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