Caregiver Perspectives on Safety Problems in Home Dementia Care: Implications for Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159113
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregiver Perspectives on Safety Problems in Home Dementia Care: Implications for Education
Abstract:
Caregiver Perspectives on Safety Problems in Home Dementia Care: Implications for Education
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lach, Helen, PhD, RN, GCNS
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 3525 Caroline Mall, Saint Louis, MO, 63119, USA
Contact Telephone:(314)977-8939
Co-Authors:Yu Ping Chang, MSN, Research Assistant
Caregivers face significant challenges in providing a safe home
environment for people with Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study
was to gain insight into caregivers' experiences in managing safety
problems, in order to design interventions to improve safety care. The
study involved six focus groups of caregivers with a range of experiences
to identify the types of safety problems and barriers to providing safe
care. In addition, information about how caregivers make changes to adopt
new behaviors was discussed. Subjects were recruited from the Alzheimer's
Disease Research Center at Washington University based on the severity of
the care recipient's dementia. Two groups were caregivers of people with
CDR 0.5, two with CDR 1, and two with CDR 2 or 3. The 40 caregivers had
co-resided with the care recipient within the past year. Caregivers had an
average age of 63, were 87.3% spouses and 85.2% female. They identified a
range of safety problems including falls, cooking, driving, wandering,
medication errors, and aggressive behavior. Management strategies included
supervision, home modifications, modifying activities, and moving to more
supportive living environments. Barriers to making changes poor access to
help, not knowing when to take over, resistance of the care recipient, and
caregiver resistance. Facilitators included support, education and advice,
as well as community resources. Their descriptions of this process suggest
that methods from the health behavior literature, including Prochaska's
Stages of Change may help improve delivery of caregiver education.
Implications will be discussed. (Supported by the John A. Hartford
Geriatric Nursing Initiative, and the Saint Louis University Beaumont
Fund.)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregiver Perspectives on Safety Problems in Home Dementia Care: Implications for Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159113-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caregiver Perspectives on Safety Problems in Home Dementia Care: Implications for Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lach, Helen, PhD, RN, GCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 3525 Caroline Mall, Saint Louis, MO, 63119, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(314)977-8939</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lachh@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yu Ping Chang, MSN, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Caregivers face significant challenges in providing a safe home <br/> environment for people with Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study <br/> was to gain insight into caregivers' experiences in managing safety <br/> problems, in order to design interventions to improve safety care. The <br/> study involved six focus groups of caregivers with a range of experiences <br/> to identify the types of safety problems and barriers to providing safe <br/> care. In addition, information about how caregivers make changes to adopt <br/> new behaviors was discussed. Subjects were recruited from the Alzheimer's <br/> Disease Research Center at Washington University based on the severity of <br/> the care recipient's dementia. Two groups were caregivers of people with <br/> CDR 0.5, two with CDR 1, and two with CDR 2 or 3. The 40 caregivers had <br/> co-resided with the care recipient within the past year. Caregivers had an <br/> average age of 63, were 87.3% spouses and 85.2% female. They identified a <br/> range of safety problems including falls, cooking, driving, wandering, <br/> medication errors, and aggressive behavior. Management strategies included <br/> supervision, home modifications, modifying activities, and moving to more <br/> supportive living environments. Barriers to making changes poor access to <br/> help, not knowing when to take over, resistance of the care recipient, and <br/> caregiver resistance. Facilitators included support, education and advice, <br/> as well as community resources. Their descriptions of this process suggest <br/> that methods from the health behavior literature, including Prochaska's <br/> Stages of Change may help improve delivery of caregiver education. <br/> Implications will be discussed. (Supported by the John A. Hartford <br/> Geriatric Nursing Initiative, and the Saint Louis University Beaumont <br/> Fund.)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.