2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159115
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health-Related Goals among Primary Care Patients
Abstract:
Health-Related Goals among Primary Care Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lauver, Diane, PhD, APRN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Women's health, 600 Highland Ave K6/350 CSC, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608 263 5286
Co-Authors:Chiraporn Worawong, MSN, RN, Predoctoral Student and Christie Olsen, MSN, WHNPC, Nurse Practitioner
Background: Most adults do not engage in health behaviors as often as
recommended. Although researchers have tested interventions to promote
health behaviors, they have focused on health behaviors chosen by
themselves, not by participants. There are scant data describing primary
care patients' health goals. Theoretical framework: Based on theories and
research on motivation and goal setting, behavioral interventions can be
more effective when based on participants' own goals (Deci & Ryan, 2000;
Stretcher, Seijts, Kok, et al., 1995). Purpose: Our main study aim was to
identify health goals among primary care patients seeing nurse
practitioners. Our future aim is to test theory-based, individualized,
nursing interventions to help people reach their goals regarding health
behaviors. Method: A descriptive design was used. Participants:
Participants (N=50) were adults who attended primary care clinics for
non-emergent reasons. Typically, they were female, Caucasian, and between
20-40 years old. Participants anonymously completed questions about their
first and second health goals. Using content analyses, researchers
independently read responses for themes. Based on themes, they developed
categories independently, and later by consensus. They coded responses
into categories with consensus. Results: Ninety-two percent of
participants identified goals. Common goals were: physical activity 58% &
27% (first and second, respectively), weight loss (29% & 10%), and sound
nutrition (9% & 17%). Participants often shared that they wanted
practitioners' initial advice and subsequent follow-up. They preferred to
work on their goals on their own, rather than with peers. They preferred
to obtain related information in a face-to-face manner. Conclusions:
Findings can: a) inform nurses as they endeavor to promote health
behaviors among populations similar to our sample and b) guide researchers
in designing individualized interventions congruent with participants'
health goals to improve their health behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth-Related Goals among Primary Care Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159115-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health-Related Goals among Primary Care Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lauver, Diane, PhD, APRN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Women's health, 600 Highland Ave K6/350 CSC, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608 263 5286</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drlauver@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chiraporn Worawong, MSN, RN, Predoctoral Student and Christie Olsen, MSN, WHNPC, Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Most adults do not engage in health behaviors as often as <br/> recommended. Although researchers have tested interventions to promote <br/> health behaviors, they have focused on health behaviors chosen by <br/> themselves, not by participants. There are scant data describing primary <br/> care patients' health goals. Theoretical framework: Based on theories and <br/> research on motivation and goal setting, behavioral interventions can be <br/> more effective when based on participants' own goals (Deci &amp; Ryan, 2000; <br/> Stretcher, Seijts, Kok, et al., 1995). Purpose: Our main study aim was to <br/> identify health goals among primary care patients seeing nurse <br/> practitioners. Our future aim is to test theory-based, individualized, <br/> nursing interventions to help people reach their goals regarding health <br/> behaviors. Method: A descriptive design was used. Participants: <br/> Participants (N=50) were adults who attended primary care clinics for <br/> non-emergent reasons. Typically, they were female, Caucasian, and between <br/> 20-40 years old. Participants anonymously completed questions about their <br/> first and second health goals. Using content analyses, researchers <br/> independently read responses for themes. Based on themes, they developed <br/> categories independently, and later by consensus. They coded responses <br/> into categories with consensus. Results: Ninety-two percent of <br/> participants identified goals. Common goals were: physical activity 58% &amp; <br/> 27% (first and second, respectively), weight loss (29% &amp; 10%), and sound <br/> nutrition (9% &amp; 17%). Participants often shared that they wanted <br/> practitioners' initial advice and subsequent follow-up. They preferred to <br/> work on their goals on their own, rather than with peers. They preferred <br/> to obtain related information in a face-to-face manner. Conclusions: <br/> Findings can: a) inform nurses as they endeavor to promote health <br/> behaviors among populations similar to our sample and b) guide researchers <br/> in designing individualized interventions congruent with participants'<br/> health goals to improve their health behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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