2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159117
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy on Nurses' Professional Practice Behaviors
Abstract:
The Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy on Nurses' Professional Practice Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Manojlovich, Milisa, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 4306, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734-936-3055
Purpose: This study investigated the interaction between environmental
factors (structural empowerment and nursing leadership) and self-efficacy
for nursing practice, to determine if self-efficacy could contribute to
more professional nursing behaviors. Increasing self-efficacy for nursing
practice may improve nurses' professional practice behaviors because
individuals not only react to environmental influences, but also have the
ability to exercise self-influence in order to shape their social systems
proactively and generatively. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: A new
theory was developed that suggests the interaction between environmental
factors such as structural empowerment and nursing leadership, and
self-efficacy may determine whether a nurse's practice behavior is either
professional or more task-focused. The effect of the environment on
practice, one's interpretation of that effect, and belief in the ability
to do something about it, may affect one's resolve to practice according
to professional standards. Subjects/Method: The study used a
non-experimental survey design. 500 nurses throughout Michigan were
randomly sampled and 364 nurses responded, resulting in 266 usable
surveys. Path analysis was used to demonstrate both direct and indirect
relationships. Mediation was also tested through SobelÆs tests. Results:
Self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between structural
empowerment and professional practice behaviors. Sobel's test was not
significant when self-efficacy was proposed to mediate the relationship
between structural empowerment and professional practice behaviors in the
group who perceived weak nursing leadership, but the test was significant
when the same relationships were proposed in the group who perceived
strong nursing leadership, as well as in the model where nursing
leadership was not included. Conclusions: Hospitals may need to provide
opportunity, information, resources, and support before staff nurses
believe they can exercise control over their work lives. Nurse managers
may want to provide opportunities for enhancing self-efficacy, such as
role modeling and verbal persuasion; recognizing that through improved
self-efficacy, practice behaviors may improve as well.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy on Nurses' Professional Practice Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159117-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy on Nurses' Professional Practice Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Manojlovich, Milisa, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 N. Ingalls, Room 4306, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734-936-3055</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mmanojlo@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study investigated the interaction between environmental <br/> factors (structural empowerment and nursing leadership) and self-efficacy <br/> for nursing practice, to determine if self-efficacy could contribute to <br/> more professional nursing behaviors. Increasing self-efficacy for nursing <br/> practice may improve nurses' professional practice behaviors because <br/> individuals not only react to environmental influences, but also have the <br/> ability to exercise self-influence in order to shape their social systems <br/> proactively and generatively. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: A new <br/> theory was developed that suggests the interaction between environmental <br/> factors such as structural empowerment and nursing leadership, and <br/> self-efficacy may determine whether a nurse's practice behavior is either <br/> professional or more task-focused. The effect of the environment on <br/> practice, one's interpretation of that effect, and belief in the ability <br/> to do something about it, may affect one's resolve to practice according <br/> to professional standards. Subjects/Method: The study used a <br/> non-experimental survey design. 500 nurses throughout Michigan were <br/> randomly sampled and 364 nurses responded, resulting in 266 usable <br/> surveys. Path analysis was used to demonstrate both direct and indirect <br/> relationships. Mediation was also tested through Sobel&AElig;s tests. Results: <br/> Self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between structural <br/> empowerment and professional practice behaviors. Sobel's test was not <br/> significant when self-efficacy was proposed to mediate the relationship <br/> between structural empowerment and professional practice behaviors in the <br/> group who perceived weak nursing leadership, but the test was significant <br/> when the same relationships were proposed in the group who perceived <br/> strong nursing leadership, as well as in the model where nursing <br/> leadership was not included. Conclusions: Hospitals may need to provide <br/> opportunity, information, resources, and support before staff nurses <br/> believe they can exercise control over their work lives. Nurse managers <br/> may want to provide opportunities for enhancing self-efficacy, such as <br/> role modeling and verbal persuasion; recognizing that through improved <br/> self-efficacy, practice behaviors may improve as well.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.