Misconceptions in common sense models of MI: First step in the development of a tailored intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159118
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Misconceptions in common sense models of MI: First step in the development of a tailored intervention
Abstract:
Misconceptions in common sense models of MI: First step in the development of a tailored intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Martin, Rene, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 374 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-3609
Co-Authors:Katherine Barnett, BA, Research Assistant; James Bunde, PhDc, BA; and Ju Young Shin, MSN
As the first step in the development of an intervention, pilot data
were collected to identify the frequency of misconceptions in patients'
common sense models of myocardial infarction (MI). In prior work (Martin
et al., in press), we found that patients' common sense explanations for
MI predicted subsequent efforts to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors
(e.g., smokers who did not implicate smoking in their personal
explanations for MI continued to smoke). Thus, interventions targeting the
identification and modification of such misconceptions may improve post-MI
outcomes. All participants (N=136) had been diagnosed with an acute MI. A
semi-structured interview was used to assess factors participants believed
might have contributed to their MIs. Narrative responses were content
analyzed to identify statements related to the modifiable risk factors of
smoking, sedentary lifestyle, and high fat diet; excellent interrater
reliability was observed. Participants' explanations then were compared to
medical records to identify the frequency of matches and mismatches. Among
smokers, only 29% identified smoking as a factor that contributed to their
MI. Only 30% of hyperlipidemic and/or obese participants discussed diet as
an MI contributing factor. Of participants judged to be sedentary by
rehabilitation nurses, only 36% indicated that a lack of exercise had been
a factor in their MI. Only 7% showed a perfect match between the
modifiable risk factors documented in their medical records and their
common sense explanations for MI. We now are in the process of using these
pilot data in the development of a tailored intervention designed to
facilitate conceptual change among MI patients who incorporate
misconceptions in their nanve models of heart disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMisconceptions in common sense models of MI: First step in the development of a tailored interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159118-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Misconceptions in common sense models of MI: First step in the development of a tailored intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martin, Rene, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 374 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-3609</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rene-martin@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Katherine Barnett, BA, Research Assistant; James Bunde, PhDc, BA; and Ju Young Shin, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the first step in the development of an intervention, pilot data <br/> were collected to identify the frequency of misconceptions in patients' <br/> common sense models of myocardial infarction (MI). In prior work (Martin <br/> et al., in press), we found that patients' common sense explanations for <br/> MI predicted subsequent efforts to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors <br/> (e.g., smokers who did not implicate smoking in their personal <br/> explanations for MI continued to smoke). Thus, interventions targeting the <br/> identification and modification of such misconceptions may improve post-MI <br/> outcomes. All participants (N=136) had been diagnosed with an acute MI. A <br/> semi-structured interview was used to assess factors participants believed <br/> might have contributed to their MIs. Narrative responses were content <br/> analyzed to identify statements related to the modifiable risk factors of <br/> smoking, sedentary lifestyle, and high fat diet; excellent interrater <br/> reliability was observed. Participants' explanations then were compared to <br/> medical records to identify the frequency of matches and mismatches. Among <br/> smokers, only 29% identified smoking as a factor that contributed to their <br/> MI. Only 30% of hyperlipidemic and/or obese participants discussed diet as <br/> an MI contributing factor. Of participants judged to be sedentary by <br/> rehabilitation nurses, only 36% indicated that a lack of exercise had been <br/> a factor in their MI. Only 7% showed a perfect match between the <br/> modifiable risk factors documented in their medical records and their <br/> common sense explanations for MI. We now are in the process of using these <br/> pilot data in the development of a tailored intervention designed to <br/> facilitate conceptual change among MI patients who incorporate <br/> misconceptions in their nanve models of heart disease.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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