2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159119
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression Predicts Delay in Seeking Treatment for Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Depression Predicts Delay in Seeking Treatment for Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Martin, Rene, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 374 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-3609
Co-Authors:James Bunde, PhDc, BA
The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of depression on
treatment-seeking behaviors among persons experiencing symptoms of an
evolving myocardial infarction (MI). Depression has been identified as a
risk factor for MI; however, previous research has not considered how
depression might affect the treatment-seeking behaviors of people who
experience acute cardiac symptoms. Participants (N=433; 71% male) had been
diagnosed with an MI. Depression was assessed with the PRIME-MD Patient
Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Participants completed the PHQ-9 with regard
to how they had felt during the 2-weeks preceding hospitalization for MI;
71 (23%) participants scored above the threshold for depression. A
semi-structured telephone interview was used to assess MI symptoms and
treatment delay behaviors. A survival analysis using the Cox proportional
hazards model found that participants who were depressed were
significantly more likely to delay in seeking treatment for evolving MI
symptoms (p=.002), even after controlling for the effects of age, gender,
history of prior MI, severity of heart disease, and other key variables.
Compared to those who were not depressed, depressed participants
experienced significantly more MI symptoms (p < .001). However, depressed
participants were just as likely as their non-depressed counterparts to
think their evolving symptoms might be cardiac in origin; depressed and
non-depressed participants also perceived their symptoms to be comparable
in severity. Depressed (vs. non-depressed) participants were more likely
to consult support persons about their symptoms (p=.01). Those who were
depressed actually were significantly more likely to be advised by a
support person to seek medical care (p=.01). Findings suggest that
depressed MI victims delay in seeking treatment, even in the context of
sound advice from support persons.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression Predicts Delay in Seeking Treatment for Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159119-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression Predicts Delay in Seeking Treatment for Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martin, Rene, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult/Gerontology Nursing, 374 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-3609</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rene-martin@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">James Bunde, PhDc, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of depression on <br/> treatment-seeking behaviors among persons experiencing symptoms of an <br/> evolving myocardial infarction (MI). Depression has been identified as a <br/> risk factor for MI; however, previous research has not considered how <br/> depression might affect the treatment-seeking behaviors of people who <br/> experience acute cardiac symptoms. Participants (N=433; 71% male) had been <br/> diagnosed with an MI. Depression was assessed with the PRIME-MD Patient <br/> Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Participants completed the PHQ-9 with regard <br/> to how they had felt during the 2-weeks preceding hospitalization for MI; <br/> 71 (23%) participants scored above the threshold for depression. A <br/> semi-structured telephone interview was used to assess MI symptoms and <br/> treatment delay behaviors. A survival analysis using the Cox proportional <br/> hazards model found that participants who were depressed were <br/> significantly more likely to delay in seeking treatment for evolving MI <br/> symptoms (p=.002), even after controlling for the effects of age, gender, <br/> history of prior MI, severity of heart disease, and other key variables. <br/> Compared to those who were not depressed, depressed participants <br/> experienced significantly more MI symptoms (p &lt; .001). However, depressed <br/> participants were just as likely as their non-depressed counterparts to <br/> think their evolving symptoms might be cardiac in origin; depressed and <br/> non-depressed participants also perceived their symptoms to be comparable <br/> in severity. Depressed (vs. non-depressed) participants were more likely <br/> to consult support persons about their symptoms (p=.01). Those who were <br/> depressed actually were significantly more likely to be advised by a <br/> support person to seek medical care (p=.01). Findings suggest that <br/> depressed MI victims delay in seeking treatment, even in the context of <br/> sound advice from support persons.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.