2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159121
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of a Scale to Measure the Quality of Parent Distraction Coaching
Abstract:
Development of a Scale to Measure the Quality of Parent Distraction Coaching
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:McCarthy, Ann Marie, FAAN, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Educational Psychology, Newton Rd, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-7086
Co-Authors:Charmaine Kleiber, FAAN, PhD, MSN, RN, Associate Professor, Kirsten Hanrahan, MSN, RN, Project Director, Latisha Meyers, BSN
BACKGROUND Parents are often trained as distraction coaches to help
their children during medical procedures. The effectiveness of parent
distraction coaching is usually measured by the frequency of distraction
behavior. However, effectiveness of distraction may be influenced by the
quality of distraction coaching. A measure of the quality of distraction
coaching is needed to evaluate the treatment integrity and effectiveness
of distraction coaching.
PURPOSE A multi-site research project is being conducted with parents as
distraction coaches. This poster describes the process of development and
validation of an observation rating scale to measure the quality of
parentsÆ distraction coaching.
METHODS AND DESIGN The development and validation process includes
three-steps. 1) Nine researchers/clinicians, using nominal group
technique, generated and refined a comprehensive list of behavioral
indicators characteristic of quality distraction coaching. 2) Focus group
methodology was used to conceptually group the behaviors into a scale with
five domains, each with multiple behavioral indicators, and weighted
values for each domain. Concept definition was guided by KahnemenÆs
"limited capacity for attention" theory and Lollins & KuczynoskiÆs
"bidirectionality of parent-child relationships" theory. 3) Construct
validity is being evaluated through use of the scale with "known groups".
Videotapes (n=20) of two groups (Expert Coaches: Child Life Specialist &
Novice Coaches: untrained parents) will be scored with the scale by two
independent coders blinded to the level of expertise. Inter-rater
reliabilities will be calculated.
RESULTS The following will be presented: 1) 40 behaviors characteristic of
quality distraction 2) Behaviors grouped into Five Domains: sensitive to
childÆs development, sensitive to childÆs cues, focus on distraction,
effort to engage child in distraction, encourages child to use distraction
3) Construct validity and reliability testing results.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of a Scale to Measure the Quality of Parent Distraction Coachingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159121-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of a Scale to Measure the Quality of Parent Distraction Coaching</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCarthy, Ann Marie, FAAN, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Educational Psychology, Newton Rd, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-7086</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ann-mccarthy@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Charmaine Kleiber, FAAN, PhD, MSN, RN, Associate Professor, Kirsten Hanrahan, MSN, RN, Project Director, Latisha Meyers, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND Parents are often trained as distraction coaches to help <br/> their children during medical procedures. The effectiveness of parent <br/> distraction coaching is usually measured by the frequency of distraction <br/> behavior. However, effectiveness of distraction may be influenced by the <br/> quality of distraction coaching. A measure of the quality of distraction <br/> coaching is needed to evaluate the treatment integrity and effectiveness <br/> of distraction coaching. <br/> PURPOSE A multi-site research project is being conducted with parents as <br/> distraction coaches. This poster describes the process of development and <br/> validation of an observation rating scale to measure the quality of <br/> parents&AElig; distraction coaching.<br/> METHODS AND DESIGN The development and validation process includes <br/> three-steps. 1) Nine researchers/clinicians, using nominal group <br/> technique, generated and refined a comprehensive list of behavioral <br/> indicators characteristic of quality distraction coaching. 2) Focus group <br/> methodology was used to conceptually group the behaviors into a scale with <br/> five domains, each with multiple behavioral indicators, and weighted <br/> values for each domain. Concept definition was guided by Kahnemen&AElig;s <br/> &quot;limited capacity for attention&quot; theory and Lollins &amp; Kuczynoski&AElig;s <br/> &quot;bidirectionality of parent-child relationships&quot; theory. 3) Construct <br/> validity is being evaluated through use of the scale with &quot;known groups&quot;. <br/> Videotapes (n=20) of two groups (Expert Coaches: Child Life Specialist &amp; <br/> Novice Coaches: untrained parents) will be scored with the scale by two <br/> independent coders blinded to the level of expertise. Inter-rater <br/> reliabilities will be calculated.<br/> RESULTS The following will be presented: 1) 40 behaviors characteristic of <br/> quality distraction 2) Behaviors grouped into Five Domains: sensitive to <br/> child&AElig;s development, sensitive to child&AElig;s cues, focus on distraction, <br/> effort to engage child in distraction, encourages child to use distraction <br/> 3) Construct validity and reliability testing results.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.