Comparison of Patients and Family Members Regarding Inherited Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Recommendations for Communicating Risk Information

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159123
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Patients and Family Members Regarding Inherited Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Recommendations for Communicating Risk Information
Abstract:
Comparison of Patients and Family Members Regarding Inherited Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Recommendations for Communicating Risk Information
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Mellon, Suzanne, PhD, MS, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Title:Dean
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 4001 W. McNichols - PO Box 19900, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA
Contact Telephone:313-993-1208
Co-Authors:Robin Gold, MS, CGC, Research Coordinator; Lisa Berry-Bobovski, BS, Associate Director; Nancy Levin, BS, Research Coordinator; and Michael Tainsky, PhD, Professor
Genetic risk assessment involving BRCA1 and BRCA2 have led to new
options for families with histories of breast and ovarian cancer. However,
little research has been carried out with individuals and their families
regarding what similarities or differences may be present between family
members in the meaning of cancer risk information and how best to
communicate risk information. The purpose of this study was to compare
participants' perceptions and concerns regarding inherited cancer risk
information. A secondary purpose was to explore recommendations for health
care providers in communicating cancer risk information. A family stress
model based on McCubbin and McCubbin was used to guide this research. Nine
focus groups of family dyads were conducted (N=39) consisting of breast or
ovarian cancer patients and close female relatives. A diverse sample of
Caucasian (N=27) and African-American (N=12) participants was represented.
A semi-structured interview guide was used in one-time group interviews.
Content analysis of transcribed focus group interviews was done using the
qualitative software package NVivo. Examples of themes for patients
included facing mortality, keeping control of the cancer, and guilt in
passing along the cancer. For close family relatives, examples of themes
included guilt over the patient having cancer, providing support to the
patient, and fear of getting cancer. While differences were noted,
similarities were present across families, most notably worry for female
relatives getting cancer, and fear of their family being at higher risk.
Families also shared specific recommendations for communicating genetic
risk information that involves the entire family. The results from this
qualitative study suggest important factors to consider in communicating
genetic cancer risk information to individual family members and ways to
best communicate inherited breast or ovarian cancer risk to families who
may potentially be at risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Patients and Family Members Regarding Inherited Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Recommendations for Communicating Risk Informationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159123-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Patients and Family Members Regarding Inherited Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Recommendations for Communicating Risk Information</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mellon, Suzanne, PhD, MS, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 4001 W. McNichols - PO Box 19900, Detroit, MI, 48221-3038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313-993-1208</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mellonsk@udmercy.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robin Gold, MS, CGC, Research Coordinator; Lisa Berry-Bobovski, BS, Associate Director; Nancy Levin, BS, Research Coordinator; and Michael Tainsky, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Genetic risk assessment involving BRCA1 and BRCA2 have led to new <br/> options for families with histories of breast and ovarian cancer. However, <br/> little research has been carried out with individuals and their families <br/> regarding what similarities or differences may be present between family <br/> members in the meaning of cancer risk information and how best to <br/> communicate risk information. The purpose of this study was to compare <br/> participants' perceptions and concerns regarding inherited cancer risk <br/> information. A secondary purpose was to explore recommendations for health <br/> care providers in communicating cancer risk information. A family stress <br/> model based on McCubbin and McCubbin was used to guide this research. Nine <br/> focus groups of family dyads were conducted (N=39) consisting of breast or <br/> ovarian cancer patients and close female relatives. A diverse sample of <br/> Caucasian (N=27) and African-American (N=12) participants was represented. <br/> A semi-structured interview guide was used in one-time group interviews. <br/> Content analysis of transcribed focus group interviews was done using the <br/> qualitative software package NVivo. Examples of themes for patients <br/> included facing mortality, keeping control of the cancer, and guilt in <br/> passing along the cancer. For close family relatives, examples of themes <br/> included guilt over the patient having cancer, providing support to the <br/> patient, and fear of getting cancer. While differences were noted, <br/> similarities were present across families, most notably worry for female <br/> relatives getting cancer, and fear of their family being at higher risk. <br/> Families also shared specific recommendations for communicating genetic <br/> risk information that involves the entire family. The results from this <br/> qualitative study suggest important factors to consider in communicating <br/> genetic cancer risk information to individual family members and ways to <br/> best communicate inherited breast or ovarian cancer risk to families who <br/> may potentially be at risk.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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