Pre-oxygenation Practices of Nurses Prior to Tracheal Suctioning of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159124
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pre-oxygenation Practices of Nurses Prior to Tracheal Suctioning of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury
Abstract:
Pre-oxygenation Practices of Nurses Prior to Tracheal Suctioning of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Stevens, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 720 W. Gordon Terrace 19C, Chicago, IL, 60613, USA
Contact Telephone:3122384813
Co-Authors:Meg Gulanick, Associate Professor; Maria Connolly, Dean; and Nancy Spector, Director
Problem: Hypoxemia and hypoxia-induced physiological changes are acknowledged complications of airway suctioning. Prior research recommends pre-oxygenation prior to suctioning as essential to prevent or minimize hypoxemia (Stone & Turner, 1989; Chulay, 1987; Stone, 1990). A pilot study indicated pre-oxygenation is performed during hospitalization; however, it is not routinely included in discharge instructions (Stevens, 1999). The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe pre-oxygenation practices of nurses who perform tracheal suctioning with individuals with spinal cord injury and identify decision making factors used when altering the method and frequency of pre-oxygenation. Framework: Patients who require routine tracheal suctioning demonstrate physiological adaptation. The Roy Adaptation Model and ventilatory acclimatization are used to explain decision-making process over time. Methodology: Members of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses and American Spinal Cord Injury Association participated in a Web-based survey on pre-oxygenation practices and factors which contribute to a decision to do more or do less in terms of pre-oxygenation. Results: There were a total of 242 responses with 232 useable surveys. Pre-oxygenation is recommended prior to tracheal suctioning, however only twenty-five percent of the respondents (n=58) respondents indicated this as their practice. The larger number of respondents (n=174) indicated they either did not pre-oxygenate (n=43) or were active decision makers (n=131) choosing to pre-oxygenate some or most of the time based on patient, environmental or time factors. Cluster analysis methods identified different factors are used when making decision to do less or to do more in terms of pre-oxygenation. Results and differences in decision making patterns will be reported in the context of rehabilitation nursing practice. Relevance: Nurses play a crucial role teaching patients and familiesÆ procedures, such as tracheal suctioning, necessary post-discharge. Little is known about how nurses make a decision to change the method and/or frequency of pre-oxygenation and its influence on discharge instructions. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePre-oxygenation Practices of Nurses Prior to Tracheal Suctioning of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159124-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pre-oxygenation Practices of Nurses Prior to Tracheal Suctioning of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stevens, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 720 W. Gordon Terrace 19C, Chicago, IL, 60613, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3122384813</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kas1chic@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Meg Gulanick, Associate Professor; Maria Connolly, Dean; and Nancy Spector, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Hypoxemia and hypoxia-induced physiological changes are acknowledged complications of airway suctioning. Prior research recommends pre-oxygenation prior to suctioning as essential to prevent or minimize hypoxemia (Stone &amp; Turner, 1989; Chulay, 1987; Stone, 1990). A pilot study indicated pre-oxygenation is performed during hospitalization; however, it is not routinely included in discharge instructions (Stevens, 1999). The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe pre-oxygenation practices of nurses who perform tracheal suctioning with individuals with spinal cord injury and identify decision making factors used when altering the method and frequency of pre-oxygenation. Framework: Patients who require routine tracheal suctioning demonstrate physiological adaptation. The Roy Adaptation Model and ventilatory acclimatization are used to explain decision-making process over time. Methodology: Members of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses and American Spinal Cord Injury Association participated in a Web-based survey on pre-oxygenation practices and factors which contribute to a decision to do more or do less in terms of pre-oxygenation. Results: There were a total of 242 responses with 232 useable surveys. Pre-oxygenation is recommended prior to tracheal suctioning, however only twenty-five percent of the respondents (n=58) respondents indicated this as their practice. The larger number of respondents (n=174) indicated they either did not pre-oxygenate (n=43) or were active decision makers (n=131) choosing to pre-oxygenate some or most of the time based on patient, environmental or time factors. Cluster analysis methods identified different factors are used when making decision to do less or to do more in terms of pre-oxygenation. Results and differences in decision making patterns will be reported in the context of rehabilitation nursing practice. Relevance: Nurses play a crucial role teaching patients and families&AElig; procedures, such as tracheal suctioning, necessary post-discharge. Little is known about how nurses make a decision to change the method and/or frequency of pre-oxygenation and its influence on discharge instructions. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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