2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159125
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Less Chest Pain During Acute Coronary Syndromes is Associated With Diabetes
Abstract:
Less Chest Pain During Acute Coronary Syndromes is Associated With Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:DeVon, Holli, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Contact Address:Nursing Bldg 105, Room 2875, 2160 S. First Ave., Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Co-Authors:S. Penckofer and A.L. Ochs, Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL
Background: The global burden of diabetes is significant and increasing at epidemic rates in developed nations. Diabetes imparts a four-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease and is associated with more complications and poorer outcomes following acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Patients with diabetes often experience cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) manifested by painless myocardial ischemia. CAN may also impact the way patients perceive other symptoms of ACS. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in the type, location, quality, and severity of symptoms during an episode of ACS; risk factors; and baseline characteristics of patients with diabetes compared to those without diabetes. Methods: A descriptive, comparative, cross-sectional design was utilized. A convenience sample of 112 women and 144 men from two large, urban, regional medical centers in the Midwest participated in the study. The Symptoms of Acute Coronary Syndromes Inventory was used to measure symptom type, location, quality, and severity of pain. Interviews were conducted in the patient's room a minimum of 12 hours after admission. Results: Patients with diabetes comprised 33.2% of the sample and were more likely to have a history of heart disease (chi 2 =11.62, p<.01) and coronary interventions (chi 2 = 8.16, p<.01) compared to those without diabetes. Nearly all patients had Type 2 diabetes (96.5%) and mean length of time since diagnosis was 13.5 (+/- 13.4) years. Patients with diabetes had significantly more risk factors including hypertension (chi 2 = 9.9, p<.01) and obesity (chi 2 = 6.0, p<.02). Of note, patients with diabetes reported significantly less chest pain (chi 2 = 4.21, p =.04), less heat sensations (chi 2 = 4.33, p = 61;.04), and more unusual fatigue (chi 2 = 6.9, p<.01) compared to those patients without diabetes. Discussion: Lack of chest pain in patients with diabetes is a serious concern since this is the hallmark symptom of ACS and is well known to the public. This could contribute to a delay in accessing emergency medical services or a decision to forgo care altogether if patients erroneously believe that their symptoms are related to changes in blood sugar or caused by other minor illnesses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLess Chest Pain During Acute Coronary Syndromes is Associated With Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159125-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Less Chest Pain During Acute Coronary Syndromes is Associated With Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DeVon, Holli, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Bldg 105, Room 2875, 2160 S. First Ave., Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hdevon@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Penckofer and A.L. Ochs, Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The global burden of diabetes is significant and increasing at epidemic rates in developed nations. Diabetes imparts a four-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease and is associated with more complications and poorer outcomes following acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Patients with diabetes often experience cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) manifested by painless myocardial ischemia. CAN may also impact the way patients perceive other symptoms of ACS. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine differences in the type, location, quality, and severity of symptoms during an episode of ACS; risk factors; and baseline characteristics of patients with diabetes compared to those without diabetes. Methods: A descriptive, comparative, cross-sectional design was utilized. A convenience sample of 112 women and 144 men from two large, urban, regional medical centers in the Midwest participated in the study. The Symptoms of Acute Coronary Syndromes Inventory was used to measure symptom type, location, quality, and severity of pain. Interviews were conducted in the patient's room a minimum of 12 hours after admission. Results: Patients with diabetes comprised 33.2% of the sample and were more likely to have a history of heart disease (chi 2 =11.62, p&lt;.01) and coronary interventions (chi 2 = 8.16, p&lt;.01) compared to those without diabetes. Nearly all patients had Type 2 diabetes (96.5%) and mean length of time since diagnosis was 13.5 (+/- 13.4) years. Patients with diabetes had significantly more risk factors including hypertension (chi 2 = 9.9, p&lt;.01) and obesity (chi 2 = 6.0, p&lt;.02). Of note, patients with diabetes reported significantly less chest pain (chi 2 = 4.21, p =.04), less heat sensations (chi 2 = 4.33, p = 61;.04), and more unusual fatigue (chi 2 = 6.9, p&lt;.01) compared to those patients without diabetes. Discussion: Lack of chest pain in patients with diabetes is a serious concern since this is the hallmark symptom of ACS and is well known to the public. This could contribute to a delay in accessing emergency medical services or a decision to forgo care altogether if patients erroneously believe that their symptoms are related to changes in blood sugar or caused by other minor illnesses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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