Patterns of Nursing Intervention Use Across Six Days for Three Older Patient Populations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159127
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Nursing Intervention Use Across Six Days for Three Older Patient Populations
Abstract:
Patterns of Nursing Intervention Use Across Six Days for Three Older Patient Populations
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2006
Author:Shever, Leah, BSN, RN - Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Project Director
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1485 Westview Dr., Coralville, IA, 52241, USA
Contact Telephone:319-335-6747
Co-Authors:Marita Titler, PhD, RN, FAAN, Principal Investigator; Joanne Dochterman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Emeritus Professor; Qiang Fei, MA; and Debra Picone, PhD, RN
Purpose: This study describes types and frequency of nursing treatments for 3 groups of patients. Research questions are 1) What are the most frequently used nursing treatments within and across groups? and 2) What are the patterns of treatment over a 6-day length of stay?

Subjects (N=1,014): Inclusion criteria: 1) 60 years old; 2) admitted to a Midwest tertiary hospital; 3) DRG/ICD 9 of heart failure, hip procedures; or at risk for falls; 4) 6 day length of stay. Mean age was 74; most were Caucasian, admitted from home, and 52% were married.

Methods: Delivered nursing treatments were extracted from a nursing outcomes effectiveness database of the parent study. Descriptive statistics were used to examine NIC treatments for each group. Patterns were analyzed by the type and frequency of NICs used per day, comparing the increase or decrease across days of hospitalization.

Findings: Commonly used NICs across the 3 groups were: Surveillance, IV Therapy, Fluid Management, and Diet Staging. Variation in types of frequently used NICs across groups reflects unique treatment needs within each group (e.g. Cardiac Care for heart failure). Patterns of intervention use from admission through day 6 varied between groups. For example, the average Cough Enhancement use decreased for the hip procedure group (X=5.5 on day 1 and X= 3.0 on day 6) but increased for the heart failure group (X=0 on day 1 and X= 1.9 on day 6).

Conclusion: This study shows actual care delivered by nurses and illustrates how integrating NIC into the electronic patient record creates a powerful tool for nurse administrators. Nurse administrators can use this type of data to support decisions about resource allocation, staff educational needs, nurses' accountability, and rewarding nurses. This research was supported by a grant from NIH and AHRQ (PI: Titler. NINR R01 NR05331).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Nursing Intervention Use Across Six Days for Three Older Patient Populationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159127-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Nursing Intervention Use Across Six Days for Three Older Patient Populations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shever, Leah, BSN, RN - Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Project Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1485 Westview Dr., Coralville, IA, 52241, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319-335-6747</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leah-shever@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marita Titler, PhD, RN, FAAN, Principal Investigator; Joanne Dochterman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Emeritus Professor; Qiang Fei, MA; and Debra Picone, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study describes types and frequency of nursing treatments for 3 groups of patients. Research questions are 1) What are the most frequently used nursing treatments within and across groups? and 2) What are the patterns of treatment over a 6-day length of stay?<br/><br/>Subjects (N=1,014): Inclusion criteria: 1) 60 years old; 2) admitted to a Midwest tertiary hospital; 3) DRG/ICD 9 of heart failure, hip procedures; or at risk for falls; 4) 6 day length of stay. Mean age was 74; most were Caucasian, admitted from home, and 52% were married. <br/><br/>Methods: Delivered nursing treatments were extracted from a nursing outcomes effectiveness database of the parent study. Descriptive statistics were used to examine NIC treatments for each group. Patterns were analyzed by the type and frequency of NICs used per day, comparing the increase or decrease across days of hospitalization.<br/><br/>Findings: Commonly used NICs across the 3 groups were: Surveillance, IV Therapy, Fluid Management, and Diet Staging. Variation in types of frequently used NICs across groups reflects unique treatment needs within each group (e.g. Cardiac Care for heart failure). Patterns of intervention use from admission through day 6 varied between groups. For example, the average Cough Enhancement use decreased for the hip procedure group (X=5.5 on day 1 and X= 3.0 on day 6) but increased for the heart failure group (X=0 on day 1 and X= 1.9 on day 6). <br/><br/>Conclusion: This study shows actual care delivered by nurses and illustrates how integrating NIC into the electronic patient record creates a powerful tool for nurse administrators. Nurse administrators can use this type of data to support decisions about resource allocation, staff educational needs, nurses' accountability, and rewarding nurses. This research was supported by a grant from NIH and AHRQ (PI: Titler. NINR R01 NR05331).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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