2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159128
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Faculty Incivility: Impact on Program Satisfaction of BSN Students
Abstract:
Faculty Incivility: Impact on Program Satisfaction of BSN Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Lasiter, R., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Central Missouri
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:11417 N Ditzler Ave, Kansas City, MO, 64157, USA
Contact Telephone:(816) 726-1179
Co-Authors:K. Marchiondo, Nursing, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI; L. Marchiondo, Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; S. Lasiter, Nursing, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO;
The purpose of this study was to discover prevalence of faculty incivility and the impact faculty incivility has on Baccalaureate senior nursing students' program satisfaction. Sample: One hundred fifty-two senior nursing students were recruited from two Midwestern universities. The sample included both male and female students from various ethnic backgrounds. Method: Questionnaires were used to measure program satisfaction, global satisfaction, optimism, and incivility. The Nursing Education Environment Survey was developed by two investigators. A measure of program satisfaction was developed by the primary investigator and optimism was measured by an existing instrument by Caza and Cortina (2007). Incivility was measured using an combined adapted scale of Workplace Incivility Scale (Cortina, Magley, Williams, & Langhout, 2007) and Incivility in Nursing Education Survey (Clark & Springer, 2007a, b), with permission (alpha = .86). We computed mean scores for incivility, optimism, and program satisfaction measures for use in further analyses. Multiple regression was used to determine if program satisfaction varied as a function of student experiences of faculty incivility. Results: Most students reported experiencing faculty incivility involving one or two faculty members. Incivility most often occurred in the classroom followed closely by clinical sites. After controlling for intervening factors, we found that student dissatisfaction with the nursing program varied significantly as a function of experiences of faculty incivility (alpha = -.47, p < .001, R2 change = .22). Conclusion: A high percentage of senior baccalaureate nursing students experience uncivil behavior by at least one or two nursing faculty. Rude interactions most commonly occur in settings where students regularly receive performance feedback from faculty. This mistreatment results in program dissatisfaction. Universities need to provide communication education for members of nursing faculty and students need to be encouraged to adopt more active responses to uncivil behavior on the part of faculty.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFaculty Incivility: Impact on Program Satisfaction of BSN Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159128-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Faculty Incivility: Impact on Program Satisfaction of BSN Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lasiter, R., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Central Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">11417 N Ditzler Ave, Kansas City, MO, 64157, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(816) 726-1179</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slasiter@ucmo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Marchiondo, Nursing, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI; L. Marchiondo, Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; S. Lasiter, Nursing, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to discover prevalence of faculty incivility and the impact faculty incivility has on Baccalaureate senior nursing students' program satisfaction. Sample: One hundred fifty-two senior nursing students were recruited from two Midwestern universities. The sample included both male and female students from various ethnic backgrounds. Method: Questionnaires were used to measure program satisfaction, global satisfaction, optimism, and incivility. The Nursing Education Environment Survey was developed by two investigators. A measure of program satisfaction was developed by the primary investigator and optimism was measured by an existing instrument by Caza and Cortina (2007). Incivility was measured using an combined adapted scale of Workplace Incivility Scale (Cortina, Magley, Williams, &amp; Langhout, 2007) and Incivility in Nursing Education Survey (Clark &amp; Springer, 2007a, b), with permission (alpha = .86). We computed mean scores for incivility, optimism, and program satisfaction measures for use in further analyses. Multiple regression was used to determine if program satisfaction varied as a function of student experiences of faculty incivility. Results: Most students reported experiencing faculty incivility involving one or two faculty members. Incivility most often occurred in the classroom followed closely by clinical sites. After controlling for intervening factors, we found that student dissatisfaction with the nursing program varied significantly as a function of experiences of faculty incivility (alpha = -.47, p &lt; .001, R2 change = .22). Conclusion: A high percentage of senior baccalaureate nursing students experience uncivil behavior by at least one or two nursing faculty. Rude interactions most commonly occur in settings where students regularly receive performance feedback from faculty. This mistreatment results in program dissatisfaction. Universities need to provide communication education for members of nursing faculty and students need to be encouraged to adopt more active responses to uncivil behavior on the part of faculty.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:43:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:43:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.