Written Goal Statements as a Predictor of Graduate Writing Outcomes by Nurse Anesthesia Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159134
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Written Goal Statements as a Predictor of Graduate Writing Outcomes by Nurse Anesthesia Students
Abstract:
Written Goal Statements as a Predictor of Graduate Writing Outcomes by Nurse Anesthesia Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oakland University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA
Contact Telephone:(248) 370-4069
Co-Authors:Gary Moore, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
The ability to write logically and coherently is essential for nurse
anesthesia (NA) students in order for them to be successful in graduate
school. In addition, abstract concepts applicable to advanced practice are
crucial for NA students to understand and apply during clinical
situations. NA students, however, are often unaware of the need for or the
importance of these cognitive skills. Using Thorndike's classical learning
theory, Connectionism (Connectionism, n.d.) as a guide, the purpose of
this study was to assess NA applicants' written goal statements and their
relationship to successful writing in a first semester graduate level
nursing theory course. The study had four distinct phases. First, all
currently enrolled NA students' goal statements from a large Midwestern
School of Nursing were obtained and were assessed for their quality of
writing on a 3-12 point Likert-type scale developed by the investigators.
Next, the NA program faculty developed a 0-3 point scale for the purpose
of evaluating new applicants' goal statements. During the third phase,
both the study investigators and the NA faculty evaluated the written goal
statements of newly admitted NA students. A high correlation was found
between the investigator scale and the NA faculty scores (r=.546, p=.016,
r2=.296). Following completion of the first semester graduate level
nursing theory course taken by newly admitted NA students in Fall 2004,
the final phase of the study will correlate final nursing theory course
grades with the written goal statement scores. Based on those results,
implications for nursing education and NA practice will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWritten Goal Statements as a Predictor of Graduate Writing Outcomes by Nurse Anesthesia Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159134-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Written Goal Statements as a Predictor of Graduate Writing Outcomes by Nurse Anesthesia Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(248) 370-4069</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">newton@oakland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gary Moore, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The ability to write logically and coherently is essential for nurse <br/> anesthesia (NA) students in order for them to be successful in graduate <br/> school. In addition, abstract concepts applicable to advanced practice are <br/> crucial for NA students to understand and apply during clinical <br/> situations. NA students, however, are often unaware of the need for or the <br/> importance of these cognitive skills. Using Thorndike's classical learning <br/> theory, Connectionism (Connectionism, n.d.) as a guide, the purpose of <br/> this study was to assess NA applicants' written goal statements and their <br/> relationship to successful writing in a first semester graduate level <br/> nursing theory course. The study had four distinct phases. First, all <br/> currently enrolled NA students' goal statements from a large Midwestern <br/> School of Nursing were obtained and were assessed for their quality of <br/> writing on a 3-12 point Likert-type scale developed by the investigators. <br/> Next, the NA program faculty developed a 0-3 point scale for the purpose <br/> of evaluating new applicants' goal statements. During the third phase, <br/> both the study investigators and the NA faculty evaluated the written goal <br/> statements of newly admitted NA students. A high correlation was found <br/> between the investigator scale and the NA faculty scores (r=.546, p=.016, <br/> r2=.296). Following completion of the first semester graduate level <br/> nursing theory course taken by newly admitted NA students in Fall 2004, <br/> the final phase of the study will correlate final nursing theory course <br/> grades with the written goal statement scores. Based on those results, <br/> implications for nursing education and NA practice will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:44:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:44:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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