HIV Risks among Health Workers at a Central Hospital in Malawi: Views of Administrators

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159137
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV Risks among Health Workers at a Central Hospital in Malawi: Views of Administrators
Abstract:
HIV Risks among Health Workers at a Central Hospital in Malawi: Views of Administrators
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Onah, Ngozi
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Nurse Scholar
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Ave. (m/c 803), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-9967940
Co-Authors:Chrissie Kaponda, Associate Dean; Kathleen Norr, Professor; and Beverly McElmurry, EdD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean
PROBLEM: In a country like Malawi where over 15% of adults are HIV infected, HIV prevention for health care workers (HCWs) is essential. HCWs are at high risk of acquiring HIV in their work and from risky personal behaviors. Health leaders (HLs) are an important source of information about current conditions and what interventions would be feasible, effective and affordable at their institution. RESEARCH QUESTION: What do HLs identify as the risk of HIV infection for HCWs in an urban referral hospital in Malawi? METHOD: For this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with four key clinical and non-clinical administrators in a central referral hospital in Malawi. The 60-90 minute interviews were conducted in English. Detailed notes were taken during the interview rather than tape-recording due to participant concerns about confidentiality. Data were analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS: All leaders agreed that the risk for occupation-related HIV among the HCWs was relatively high due to constant exposure to infected body fluid and poor professional practices. Risky sexual practices among HCWs at the workplace, such as unauthorized sex with other workers, as well as patients, also increase HIV risk. Barriers to the reduction of HIV risk include lack of knowledge, system barriers, and extreme lack of resources. IMPLICATIONS: HLs have an important role in preventing the transmission of HIV by HCWs. They need to provide a stronger training and monitoring program and to improve management to reduce system barriers. Hospitals also need more resources to provide a safe environment for workers and clients. HLs expressed eagerness for interventions that would help them improve the knowledge base practices and provide a working environment that strongly supports HIV prevention at all levels. *Partially supported by the Fogarty International Center, Office for Research on Minority Health, National Institutes of Health, Grant #TW00057.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV Risks among Health Workers at a Central Hospital in Malawi: Views of Administratorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159137-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV Risks among Health Workers at a Central Hospital in Malawi: Views of Administrators</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Onah, Ngozi</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Scholar</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Ave. (m/c 803), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-9967940</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tonah1@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chrissie Kaponda, Associate Dean; Kathleen Norr, Professor; and Beverly McElmurry, EdD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PROBLEM: In a country like Malawi where over 15% of adults are HIV infected, HIV prevention for health care workers (HCWs) is essential. HCWs are at high risk of acquiring HIV in their work and from risky personal behaviors. Health leaders (HLs) are an important source of information about current conditions and what interventions would be feasible, effective and affordable at their institution. RESEARCH QUESTION: What do HLs identify as the risk of HIV infection for HCWs in an urban referral hospital in Malawi? METHOD: For this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with four key clinical and non-clinical administrators in a central referral hospital in Malawi. The 60-90 minute interviews were conducted in English. Detailed notes were taken during the interview rather than tape-recording due to participant concerns about confidentiality. Data were analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS: All leaders agreed that the risk for occupation-related HIV among the HCWs was relatively high due to constant exposure to infected body fluid and poor professional practices. Risky sexual practices among HCWs at the workplace, such as unauthorized sex with other workers, as well as patients, also increase HIV risk. Barriers to the reduction of HIV risk include lack of knowledge, system barriers, and extreme lack of resources. IMPLICATIONS: HLs have an important role in preventing the transmission of HIV by HCWs. They need to provide a stronger training and monitoring program and to improve management to reduce system barriers. Hospitals also need more resources to provide a safe environment for workers and clients. HLs expressed eagerness for interventions that would help them improve the knowledge base practices and provide a working environment that strongly supports HIV prevention at all levels. *Partially supported by the Fogarty International Center, Office for Research on Minority Health, National Institutes of Health, Grant #TW00057.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:44:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:44:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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