2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159139
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Problem Drinking as a Risky Behavior in Emergency Department Patients
Abstract:
Problem Drinking as a Risky Behavior in Emergency Department Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Parkes, Barbara
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513-558-5268
Co-Authors:Susan Wall and Marilyn Sommers, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean
Problem drinking, patterns of alcohol use above the recommended limits proposed by the federal government, is associated with injury. Purpose: The overall project goal is to test the effectiveness of a brief intervention delivered during an Emergency Department (ED) visit. The intervention was developed to reduce selected risk-taking behaviors including problem (as compared to dependent) drinking. This abstract reports screening data collected to identify eligible subjects for enrollment in the behavioral trial. Theoretical Framework: Crisis intervention theory suggests a crisis, such as an ED visit, offers a teachable moment to change risky behaviors. Subjects: Adults 18-45 who are patients in the ED are eligible for enrollment in the trial. Dependant drinkers are excluded. Method: On screening days in the ED, all patients are screened for risky behaviors to determine eligibility in the randomized controlled trial (RCT). The RCT has a three group design with a sample size of 400. Potential subjects are asked 10 questions to determine their drinking behaviors and driving practices. Eligible subjects are then enrolled in the study protocol. Results: Over 6,000 subjects have been screened since study inception. Of the initial 2,111 subjects screened, the mean age was 40.9 years (SD 16.04), with 52% male and 48% female. The two largest racial groups represented were African American at 57.7 % and Caucasian (Not Latino) at 39.6%. Of the sample, 47% drank alcohol. Mean standard drinks on a typical day was 1.71 (SD 3.47; min/max 0/48); mean highest number of standard drinks on a single occasion was 2.24 (SD 4.39; min/max 0/50), and mean highest number of drinks in a single week was 4.13 (SD 10.27; min/max 0/108). Conclusions: Approximately half of the subjects drank alcohol, and patterns of drinking were widely variable. The ED population is an appropriate target for interventions to reduce problem drinking.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProblem Drinking as a Risky Behavior in Emergency Department Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159139-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Problem Drinking as a Risky Behavior in Emergency Department Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Parkes, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-558-5268</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">beparkes@netzero.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Wall and Marilyn Sommers, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem drinking, patterns of alcohol use above the recommended limits proposed by the federal government, is associated with injury. Purpose: The overall project goal is to test the effectiveness of a brief intervention delivered during an Emergency Department (ED) visit. The intervention was developed to reduce selected risk-taking behaviors including problem (as compared to dependent) drinking. This abstract reports screening data collected to identify eligible subjects for enrollment in the behavioral trial. Theoretical Framework: Crisis intervention theory suggests a crisis, such as an ED visit, offers a teachable moment to change risky behaviors. Subjects: Adults 18-45 who are patients in the ED are eligible for enrollment in the trial. Dependant drinkers are excluded. Method: On screening days in the ED, all patients are screened for risky behaviors to determine eligibility in the randomized controlled trial (RCT). The RCT has a three group design with a sample size of 400. Potential subjects are asked 10 questions to determine their drinking behaviors and driving practices. Eligible subjects are then enrolled in the study protocol. Results: Over 6,000 subjects have been screened since study inception. Of the initial 2,111 subjects screened, the mean age was 40.9 years (SD 16.04), with 52% male and 48% female. The two largest racial groups represented were African American at 57.7 % and Caucasian (Not Latino) at 39.6%. Of the sample, 47% drank alcohol. Mean standard drinks on a typical day was 1.71 (SD 3.47; min/max 0/48); mean highest number of standard drinks on a single occasion was 2.24 (SD 4.39; min/max 0/50), and mean highest number of drinks in a single week was 4.13 (SD 10.27; min/max 0/108). Conclusions: Approximately half of the subjects drank alcohol, and patterns of drinking were widely variable. The ED population is an appropriate target for interventions to reduce problem drinking.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:44:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:44:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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