Making instrumentation and methods for a model of social role quality in chronically ill women culturally competent: A pilot study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159142
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making instrumentation and methods for a model of social role quality in chronically ill women culturally competent: A pilot study
Abstract:
Making instrumentation and methods for a model of social role quality in chronically ill women culturally competent: A pilot study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Plach, Sandra K, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Cunningham Hall P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414 229 6920
Co-Authors:Patricia E. Stevens, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Susan M. Heidrich, PhD, RN, Professor
The purpose of this 3-phase pilot study was to ensure that measures
and methods used to test a model of role quality and health in chronically
ill women are culturally relevant and sensitive to women of color,
low-income women, and women with limited formal education. Phase 1
consisted of a review of social role measures by nurse experts with
subsequent clarification of items and sentence structure. Phase 2
consisted of two community-based focus groups: one with African-American
women (n=11, age range 19-50 years), and one with Latina women (n=11, age
range 24-66 years) conducted to seek feedback about the cultural
relevance, clarity, and readability of the role quality measures. In phase
3, face-to-face interviews were conducted with women with HIV to establish
the feasibility of oral administration of instruments measuring all model
variables, identify any problems with clarity and comprehension of the
instruments, and determine participant burden given the multiple measures.
Participants in this study phase were 13 culturally diverse (69%
African-American), low income (77% less than $10,000 annual income) women
who were living with HIV/AIDS (M age=42). About half (46%) had not
completed high school. With suggested changes incorporated at each phase,
participants in all phases reported that the social role items were
meaningful, questionnaire instructions and items were understandable, and
that responding to the questionnaires was not tiresome. Results suggest
that there is preliminary evidence that instruments and methods are
culturally relevant and sensitive for use in Latina women, and low income,
low literacy African American and White women living with chronic illness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking instrumentation and methods for a model of social role quality in chronically ill women culturally competent: A pilot studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159142-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Making instrumentation and methods for a model of social role quality in chronically ill women culturally competent: A pilot study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Plach, Sandra K, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Cunningham Hall P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414 229 6920</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">placs@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia E. Stevens, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor and Susan M. Heidrich, PhD, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this 3-phase pilot study was to ensure that measures <br/> and methods used to test a model of role quality and health in chronically <br/> ill women are culturally relevant and sensitive to women of color, <br/> low-income women, and women with limited formal education. Phase 1 <br/> consisted of a review of social role measures by nurse experts with <br/> subsequent clarification of items and sentence structure. Phase 2 <br/> consisted of two community-based focus groups: one with African-American <br/> women (n=11, age range 19-50 years), and one with Latina women (n=11, age <br/> range 24-66 years) conducted to seek feedback about the cultural <br/> relevance, clarity, and readability of the role quality measures. In phase <br/> 3, face-to-face interviews were conducted with women with HIV to establish <br/> the feasibility of oral administration of instruments measuring all model <br/> variables, identify any problems with clarity and comprehension of the <br/> instruments, and determine participant burden given the multiple measures. <br/> Participants in this study phase were 13 culturally diverse (69% <br/> African-American), low income (77% less than $10,000 annual income) women <br/> who were living with HIV/AIDS (M age=42). About half (46%) had not <br/> completed high school. With suggested changes incorporated at each phase, <br/> participants in all phases reported that the social role items were <br/> meaningful, questionnaire instructions and items were understandable, and <br/> that responding to the questionnaires was not tiresome. Results suggest <br/> that there is preliminary evidence that instruments and methods are <br/> culturally relevant and sensitive for use in Latina women, and low income, <br/> low literacy African American and White women living with chronic illness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:44:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:44:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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