Guided Participation with Mothers of Very Low Birth-Weight Infants: Feeding Competency Outcomes of a Clinical Trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159144
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Guided Participation with Mothers of Very Low Birth-Weight Infants: Feeding Competency Outcomes of a Clinical Trial
Abstract:
Guided Participation with Mothers of Very Low Birth-Weight Infants: Feeding Competency Outcomes of a Clinical Trial
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Title:Emeritus Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Contact Telephone:(608) 263-9886
Co-Authors:Rana K Limbo, PhD, RN, Clinical Director; Michele Schroeder, PhD, RN, PNP, Clinical Nurse Specialist; Roseanne Clark, PhD, Associate Professor; Roger Brown, PhD, Professor; and Jeffrey Henriques, PhD, Assistant Research Scientist
The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an
intervention, guided participation (GP), designed specifically for mothers
of very low-birth weight (VLBW), premature infants, on maternal and infant
feeding competencies. The goal of GP is development of competencies needed
for a socially important practice (e.g., parenting and caregiving of a
VLBW infant). A practice requires competencies in multiple domains,
including a relationship of the caregiver with the receiver of care,
technical knowledge and skills, communication and problem solving with
others, and regulation or management of emotions, expectations, and
intentions about the practice. In this study, GP effect on infant and
maternal feeding competencies was examined controlling for infant,
maternal, and family conditions. Five types of feeding competencies were
examined longitudinally and within age (1, 4, 8, and 12 months, post-term
age) for 42 mother- infant pairs who were randomly assigned to either GP
or Standard Care groups. The feeding competency types were: (a) infant
feeding skills; (b) maternal and infant positive affect and behavior
during feeding; and (c) maternal and infant regulation of negative affect
and behavior during feeding. The hypothesized GP effect on competencies
across infant age received support for infants (at 1 and 8 months) and for
mothers (at 4 months). The hypothesized contribution of conditions was
most strongly supported by the negative relationship of family poverty
status with the two maternal competency variables. The hypothesized GP
moderator effect on the relationship of depressive symptoms with maternal
competency variables was supported for both infant and maternal regulation
of negative affect and behavior at 8 months. Despite wide variability in
maternal attributes and family circumstances and limited power, findings
provide modest support for a GP effect on both maternal and infant feeding
competencies and suggest future study of maternal working models of
parenting and caregiving.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGuided Participation with Mothers of Very Low Birth-Weight Infants: Feeding Competency Outcomes of a Clinical Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159144-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Guided Participation with Mothers of Very Low Birth-Weight Infants: Feeding Competency Outcomes of a Clinical Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Emeritus Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(608) 263-9886</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpridham@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rana K Limbo, PhD, RN, Clinical Director; Michele Schroeder, PhD, RN, PNP, Clinical Nurse Specialist; Roseanne Clark, PhD, Associate Professor; Roger Brown, PhD, Professor; and Jeffrey Henriques, PhD, Assistant Research Scientist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of an <br/> intervention, guided participation (GP), designed specifically for mothers <br/> of very low-birth weight (VLBW), premature infants, on maternal and infant <br/> feeding competencies. The goal of GP is development of competencies needed <br/> for a socially important practice (e.g., parenting and caregiving of a <br/> VLBW infant). A practice requires competencies in multiple domains, <br/> including a relationship of the caregiver with the receiver of care, <br/> technical knowledge and skills, communication and problem solving with <br/> others, and regulation or management of emotions, expectations, and <br/> intentions about the practice. In this study, GP effect on infant and <br/> maternal feeding competencies was examined controlling for infant, <br/> maternal, and family conditions. Five types of feeding competencies were <br/> examined longitudinally and within age (1, 4, 8, and 12 months, post-term <br/> age) for 42 mother- infant pairs who were randomly assigned to either GP <br/> or Standard Care groups. The feeding competency types were: (a) infant <br/> feeding skills; (b) maternal and infant positive affect and behavior <br/> during feeding; and (c) maternal and infant regulation of negative affect <br/> and behavior during feeding. The hypothesized GP effect on competencies <br/> across infant age received support for infants (at 1 and 8 months) and for <br/> mothers (at 4 months). The hypothesized contribution of conditions was <br/> most strongly supported by the negative relationship of family poverty <br/> status with the two maternal competency variables. The hypothesized GP <br/> moderator effect on the relationship of depressive symptoms with maternal <br/> competency variables was supported for both infant and maternal regulation <br/> of negative affect and behavior at 8 months. Despite wide variability in <br/> maternal attributes and family circumstances and limited power, findings <br/> provide modest support for a GP effect on both maternal and infant feeding <br/> competencies and suggest future study of maternal working models of <br/> parenting and caregiving.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:44:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:44:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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