Self-Care and the Cultural Meanings of Mothering in African American Women with HIV/AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159152
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Care and the Cultural Meanings of Mothering in African American Women with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Self-Care and the Cultural Meanings of Mothering in African American Women with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Shambley-Ebron, Donna, PhD, MSN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 3110 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
Contact Telephone:513-558-5248
African American women as a marginalized group in American society,
daily face obstacles related to race, class, and gender that are health
threatening. When the stigma of HIV/AIDS is added, the issues and problems
surrounding illness management, childrearing and management of other
aspects of daily living are compounded. Purpose and Theoretical Framework:
The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences, values,
traditions, and beliefs of African American women who are HIV positive,
and who mother a child who is also HIV positive. This study also explored
how cultural values influence self-care and mothering in this group.
Africana Womanism and Critical Social Theory were used to guide the study.
Subjects: 10 African American mothers, who were HIV positive and who had
an HIV positive child participated in this study. They all lived in the
rural Southeastern United States. Method: Critical ethnography was the
method used for this study. Formal and informal interviews and participant
observation were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using
ethnographic analysis techniques including constant comparative analysis
and inductive analysis. Results and conclusions: Domains derived from the
research data were: Disabling Relationships, Strong Mothering, and
Re-defining Self-Care. The overarching cultural theme was identified as
Creating a Life of Meaning. African American women living with HIV/AIDS in
the rural South used culturally specific self-care and mothering
strategies indicative of core cultural values. This study dispels negative
images of African American women and acknowledges cultural strengths,
creating an impact on the ways in which nursing care is delivered and
self-care promoted with African American mothers who are living with
HIV/AIDS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Care and the Cultural Meanings of Mothering in African American Women with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159152-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Care and the Cultural Meanings of Mothering in African American Women with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shambley-Ebron, Donna, PhD, MSN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 3110 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-558-5248</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">donna.shambley-ebron@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">African American women as a marginalized group in American society, <br/> daily face obstacles related to race, class, and gender that are health <br/> threatening. When the stigma of HIV/AIDS is added, the issues and problems <br/> surrounding illness management, childrearing and management of other <br/> aspects of daily living are compounded. Purpose and Theoretical Framework: <br/> The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences, values, <br/> traditions, and beliefs of African American women who are HIV positive, <br/> and who mother a child who is also HIV positive. This study also explored <br/> how cultural values influence self-care and mothering in this group. <br/> Africana Womanism and Critical Social Theory were used to guide the study. <br/> Subjects: 10 African American mothers, who were HIV positive and who had <br/> an HIV positive child participated in this study. They all lived in the <br/> rural Southeastern United States. Method: Critical ethnography was the <br/> method used for this study. Formal and informal interviews and participant <br/> observation were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using <br/> ethnographic analysis techniques including constant comparative analysis <br/> and inductive analysis. Results and conclusions: Domains derived from the <br/> research data were: Disabling Relationships, Strong Mothering, and <br/> Re-defining Self-Care. The overarching cultural theme was identified as <br/> Creating a Life of Meaning. African American women living with HIV/AIDS in <br/> the rural South used culturally specific self-care and mothering <br/> strategies indicative of core cultural values. This study dispels negative <br/> images of African American women and acknowledges cultural strengths, <br/> creating an impact on the ways in which nursing care is delivered and <br/> self-care promoted with African American mothers who are living with <br/> HIV/AIDS.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:45:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:45:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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