Preference for Information, Perceived Control, Coping and Outcomes Following First-Time Open Heart Surgery in Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159155
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preference for Information, Perceived Control, Coping and Outcomes Following First-Time Open Heart Surgery in Older Adults
Abstract:
Preference for Information, Perceived Control, Coping and Outcomes Following First-Time Open Heart Surgery in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sorensen, Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CNOR
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 3640 Col. Glenn Hwy., Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Contact Telephone:937.775.2597
Co-Authors:Bonnie Garvin, PhD, RN, Professor
Problem Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of adults aged
65 and older. Over 55% of coronary artery bypass surgeries (CABS) are on
older adults. Older adults have more complications after CABS compared to
younger and middle adults. Given that older adults' outcomes are poorer,
coping in older adults having first time CABS was examined in relation to
preference for information and control to test the theoretical model
developed from studies of younger CABS patients. Theoretical Framework
Theories of preference for information (Miller; Krantz), coping (Lazarus &
Folkman), and older adulthood guided this study. Design and Method The
prospective descriptive design included interviews preoperatively and 6
weeks postoperatively. Measures of Preference for Information (via the
Krantz Health Opinion Survey), Perceived Control (Control Attitudes
Scale), Coping (Ways of Coping Questionnaire), Depression (Geriatric
Depression Scale) and Functional Status (Medical Outcomes Study Short
Form-12) were performed. Reliabilities ranged from 0.55 to 0.74. Subjects
Seventy adults aged 72 (SD 10.9) years having first-time CABS by one group
of surgeons in three Midwestern hospitals. Results Participants preferred
moderate information, perceived moderate control, and used positive
reappraisal to cope. Higher age was significantly related to poorer
postoperative physical function. Women had significantly greater
depression and poorer functional status both preoperatively and
postoperatively. Higher preference for information was related to better
postoperative physical function. Seeking social support and positive
reappraisal were related to shorter stay. Although depression was low
overall, preoperative depression was significantly related to coping,
functional status, and depression. Canonical relationships were not
statistically significant. Conclusions The theoretical model drawn from
younger and middle adults did not effectively predict older adults' experiences. Reliable research instruments need to be developed for older
adults. Nurses need to be aware of preference for information, gender
differences and depression in older adult CABS patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreference for Information, Perceived Control, Coping and Outcomes Following First-Time Open Heart Surgery in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159155-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preference for Information, Perceived Control, Coping and Outcomes Following First-Time Open Heart Surgery in Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sorensen, Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CNOR</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 3640 Col. Glenn Hwy., Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937.775.2597</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">elizabeth.sorensen@wright.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie Garvin, PhD, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of adults aged <br/> 65 and older. Over 55% of coronary artery bypass surgeries (CABS) are on <br/> older adults. Older adults have more complications after CABS compared to <br/> younger and middle adults. Given that older adults' outcomes are poorer, <br/> coping in older adults having first time CABS was examined in relation to <br/> preference for information and control to test the theoretical model <br/> developed from studies of younger CABS patients. Theoretical Framework <br/> Theories of preference for information (Miller; Krantz), coping (Lazarus &amp; <br/> Folkman), and older adulthood guided this study. Design and Method The <br/> prospective descriptive design included interviews preoperatively and 6 <br/> weeks postoperatively. Measures of Preference for Information (via the <br/> Krantz Health Opinion Survey), Perceived Control (Control Attitudes <br/> Scale), Coping (Ways of Coping Questionnaire), Depression (Geriatric <br/> Depression Scale) and Functional Status (Medical Outcomes Study Short <br/> Form-12) were performed. Reliabilities ranged from 0.55 to 0.74. Subjects <br/> Seventy adults aged 72 (SD 10.9) years having first-time CABS by one group <br/> of surgeons in three Midwestern hospitals. Results Participants preferred <br/> moderate information, perceived moderate control, and used positive <br/> reappraisal to cope. Higher age was significantly related to poorer <br/> postoperative physical function. Women had significantly greater <br/> depression and poorer functional status both preoperatively and <br/> postoperatively. Higher preference for information was related to better <br/> postoperative physical function. Seeking social support and positive <br/> reappraisal were related to shorter stay. Although depression was low <br/> overall, preoperative depression was significantly related to coping, <br/> functional status, and depression. Canonical relationships were not <br/> statistically significant. Conclusions The theoretical model drawn from <br/> younger and middle adults did not effectively predict older adults' experiences. Reliable research instruments need to be developed for older <br/> adults. Nurses need to be aware of preference for information, gender <br/> differences and depression in older adult CABS patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:45:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:45:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.