Caring Accessibility: APN as Supports to Family Caregivers of the Chronically, Critically Ill

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159157
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring Accessibility: APN as Supports to Family Caregivers of the Chronically, Critically Ill
Abstract:
Caring Accessibility: APN as Supports to Family Caregivers of the Chronically, Critically Ill
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Standing, Theresa, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216-368-5990
Co-Authors:Barbara Daly, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Sara Douglas, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; and Carol Kelley, PhD, APN, RN, Assistant Professor
Improvements in medical technology and therapeutics have resulted in
increasing numbers of chronically, critically ill patients who are on
mechanical ventilation for prolonged periods of time. The family
caregivers of these patients experience significant burdens as they
oversee the care of their loved ones. The purpose of this phenomenological
study was to examine the experience of chronic critical illness from the
perspective of the family caregiver, and specifically to examine their
response to an APN case manager assigned to support both patient and
caregiver. The philosophical framework underpinning this study is
hermeneutic phenomenology which seeks to elicit and describe the meaning
of human experiences. This phenomenological study is part of a larger,
intervention study involving Advanced Practice Nurses (APN) experienced in
caring for the chronically critically ill. Semi-structured interviews were
conducted with 15 family caregivers who had a loved one who had been
chronically critically ill and had been on prolonged mechanical
ventilation. Twelve of the participants had been assigned an APN case
manager and three had not. Questions including "What was it like to go
through this difficult hospitalization with your family member?" and "what
helped you get through it?" guided the interviews which were recorded,
transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using the Giorgi method of thematic
analysis. Participants described medical and nursing staff as often
providing information with reluctance and limiting this information to the
plan of care. Intervention participants portrayed the APN as providing
Caring Accessibility to information and Advocacy during an experience
fraught with stress, helplessness and confusion. Findings reveal the
hidden but critical influence of the APN's Caring Accessibility to family
caregivers and the necessity for critical care staff to appreciate the
family's experience and information needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring Accessibility: APN as Supports to Family Caregivers of the Chronically, Critically Illen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159157-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caring Accessibility: APN as Supports to Family Caregivers of the Chronically, Critically Ill</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Standing, Theresa, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-368-5990</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tss2@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Daly, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Sara Douglas, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; and Carol Kelley, PhD, APN, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Improvements in medical technology and therapeutics have resulted in <br/> increasing numbers of chronically, critically ill patients who are on <br/> mechanical ventilation for prolonged periods of time. The family <br/> caregivers of these patients experience significant burdens as they <br/> oversee the care of their loved ones. The purpose of this phenomenological <br/> study was to examine the experience of chronic critical illness from the <br/> perspective of the family caregiver, and specifically to examine their <br/> response to an APN case manager assigned to support both patient and <br/> caregiver. The philosophical framework underpinning this study is <br/> hermeneutic phenomenology which seeks to elicit and describe the meaning <br/> of human experiences. This phenomenological study is part of a larger, <br/> intervention study involving Advanced Practice Nurses (APN) experienced in <br/> caring for the chronically critically ill. Semi-structured interviews were <br/> conducted with 15 family caregivers who had a loved one who had been <br/> chronically critically ill and had been on prolonged mechanical <br/> ventilation. Twelve of the participants had been assigned an APN case <br/> manager and three had not. Questions including &quot;What was it like to go <br/> through this difficult hospitalization with your family member?&quot; and &quot;what <br/> helped you get through it?&quot; guided the interviews which were recorded, <br/> transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using the Giorgi method of thematic <br/> analysis. Participants described medical and nursing staff as often <br/> providing information with reluctance and limiting this information to the <br/> plan of care. Intervention participants portrayed the APN as providing <br/> Caring Accessibility to information and Advocacy during an experience <br/> fraught with stress, helplessness and confusion. Findings reveal the <br/> hidden but critical influence of the APN's Caring Accessibility to family <br/> caregivers and the necessity for critical care staff to appreciate the <br/> family's experience and information needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:45:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:45:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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