Quality of Life Among Children with Sickle Cell Disease Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159158
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life Among Children with Sickle Cell Disease Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy
Abstract:
Quality of Life Among Children with Sickle Cell Disease Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Stegenga, Kristin
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri - Kansas City
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2220 Holmes, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA
Contact Telephone:816/234-3292
Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that is most prevalent among those of African American and Mediterranean descent. Hemoglobin SS is the most severs form of SCD and carries an increased risk for stroke. Although the initial treatment for stroke is an exchange transfusion, the use of routine, chronic transfusion therapy (CTT) has been shown to help prevent the neurological injury. This treatment plan is rigorous and time consuming, both of which impact one's quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to explore QoL, from the child's perspective, as it is affected by CTT. Semistructured interviews were performed on 10 children undergoing CTT. Five themes emerged from the data: (a) pain, (b) school issues, (c) disease knowledge, (d) transfusion therapy, and (e) having a stroke. Data from this study reveal that CTT does have an impact on QoL. This information is important to share with those making CTT treatment decisions. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life Among Children with Sickle Cell Disease Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159158-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of Life Among Children with Sickle Cell Disease Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stegenga, Kristin</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri - Kansas City</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2220 Holmes, Kansas City, MO, 64108, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">816/234-3292</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kstegenga@cmh.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that is most prevalent among those of African American and Mediterranean descent. Hemoglobin SS is the most severs form of SCD and carries an increased risk for stroke. Although the initial treatment for stroke is an exchange transfusion, the use of routine, chronic transfusion therapy (CTT) has been shown to help prevent the neurological injury. This treatment plan is rigorous and time consuming, both of which impact one's quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to explore QoL, from the child's perspective, as it is affected by CTT. Semistructured interviews were performed on 10 children undergoing CTT. Five themes emerged from the data: (a) pain, (b) school issues, (c) disease knowledge, (d) transfusion therapy, and (e) having a stroke. Data from this study reveal that CTT does have an impact on QoL. This information is important to share with those making CTT treatment decisions. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:45:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:45:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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