Differences in Reported Mealtime Behaviors among Mexican and Michigan Low-Income Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159160
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Differences in Reported Mealtime Behaviors among Mexican and Michigan Low-Income Mothers
Abstract:
Differences in Reported Mealtime Behaviors among Mexican and Michigan Low-Income Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Strunk, Judith
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 415B West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:517-355-8360
Co-Authors:Manfred Stommel, PhD, Associate Professor and Mildred Horodynski, PhD, MN, BSN, WHNPC, Professor
There is growing awareness that mealtime behaviors of toddlers and their caregivers are influenced by cultural patterns. Comparing two convenience samples of low-income mothers in Mexico (N=160) and Michigan (N=134), this study employed English and Spanish language versions of the Child & Parent Mealtime Behavior Questionnaire developed for the Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers (NEAT) study to explore differences and similarities with respect to 5 key dimensions of mealtime behaviors: (1) caregiver insistence on controlling mealtime behaviors (5-item scale, Alpha: 0.70), (2) caregiver emphasis on social interaction (7-item scale, Alpha: 0.70), (3) caregiver tendency to become upset (4-item scale, Alpha: 0.78), (4) caregiver emphasis on child self-regulation (6-item scale, Alpha: 0.73), (5) child acceptance of new foods (3-item scale, Alpha: 73). Comparisons showed that Mexican mothers were much more likely to become upset with their toddlers (3.2 vs. 1.7 on a 5-point scale, p<0.01), while Michigan mothers tended to emphasize child self-regulation more (3.6 vs. 3.4, p<0.04). However, the latter difference appears be entirely due to differences in educational achievements, while differences in the caregivers' tendency to become upset persist even after accounting for the caregivers' age, education, employment status as well as the number children and adults living in the household. Other characteristic differences include the caregivers self-reported frequency of reading and playing with their toddlers, both of which were substantially higher among the Michigan mothers. Implications for intervention studies related to self-regulation theory are discussed. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDifferences in Reported Mealtime Behaviors among Mexican and Michigan Low-Income Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159160-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Differences in Reported Mealtime Behaviors among Mexican and Michigan Low-Income Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Strunk, Judith</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 415B West Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-355-8360</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">strunkju@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Manfred Stommel, PhD, Associate Professor and Mildred Horodynski, PhD, MN, BSN, WHNPC, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is growing awareness that mealtime behaviors of toddlers and their caregivers are influenced by cultural patterns. Comparing two convenience samples of low-income mothers in Mexico (N=160) and Michigan (N=134), this study employed English and Spanish language versions of the Child &amp; Parent Mealtime Behavior Questionnaire developed for the Nutrition Education Aimed at Toddlers (NEAT) study to explore differences and similarities with respect to 5 key dimensions of mealtime behaviors: (1) caregiver insistence on controlling mealtime behaviors (5-item scale, Alpha: 0.70), (2) caregiver emphasis on social interaction (7-item scale, Alpha: 0.70), (3) caregiver tendency to become upset (4-item scale, Alpha: 0.78), (4) caregiver emphasis on child self-regulation (6-item scale, Alpha: 0.73), (5) child acceptance of new foods (3-item scale, Alpha: 73). Comparisons showed that Mexican mothers were much more likely to become upset with their toddlers (3.2 vs. 1.7 on a 5-point scale, p&lt;0.01), while Michigan mothers tended to emphasize child self-regulation more (3.6 vs. 3.4, p&lt;0.04). However, the latter difference appears be entirely due to differences in educational achievements, while differences in the caregivers' tendency to become upset persist even after accounting for the caregivers' age, education, employment status as well as the number children and adults living in the household. Other characteristic differences include the caregivers self-reported frequency of reading and playing with their toddlers, both of which were substantially higher among the Michigan mothers. Implications for intervention studies related to self-regulation theory are discussed. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:45:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:45:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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