2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159163
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Mothers and Breastfeeding: A Special Population With Special Needs
Abstract:
Adolescent Mothers and Breastfeeding: A Special Population With Special Needs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wambach, Karen, PhD, MS, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Mailstop 4043, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913-588-1639
Although teen pregnancy rates in the United States have dropped
significantly over the past decade, it remains an important American
public health concern that costs society approximately 25 billion dollars
annually. Many health and social issues surround these young mothers and
their infants, including the lower likelihood that they will initiate
breastfeeding and if initiated, do so for a shorter time than their adult
counterparts. Human milk and breastfeeding can offer teen mothers and
their infants important protection against some of the common problems
seen in this population (e.g. increased infectious disease such as
gastroenteritis) and protection against later chronic diseases such as
cancer and diabetes. As recognized by the Healthy People 2010 objectives,
the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Dietetic Association,
interventions to promote and support breastfeeding in such vulnerable
populations are needed. The purpose of this paper is to provide a state of
the science synthesis on factors of importance in predicting breastfeeding
initiation and duration, characteristics of breastfeeding experiences, and
health care provider attitudes and practices in supporting breastfeeding
in this population. Current intervention research to promote and support
breastfeeding initiation and duration will be described. In addition,
suggestions for health policy will be presented with special emphasis on
school-based support of teens wishing to return to school and continue
breastfeeding their infants. Nurse researchers and clinicians are
important in the continuing quest to improve the health of American
mothers and their children. Breastfeeding promotion and support in this
vulnerable population is integral to health promotion strategies for the
nation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Mothers and Breastfeeding: A Special Population With Special Needsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159163-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Mothers and Breastfeeding: A Special Population With Special Needs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wambach, Karen, PhD, MS, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Mailstop 4043, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-588-1639</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kwambach@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although teen pregnancy rates in the United States have dropped <br/> significantly over the past decade, it remains an important American <br/> public health concern that costs society approximately 25 billion dollars <br/> annually. Many health and social issues surround these young mothers and <br/> their infants, including the lower likelihood that they will initiate <br/> breastfeeding and if initiated, do so for a shorter time than their adult <br/> counterparts. Human milk and breastfeeding can offer teen mothers and <br/> their infants important protection against some of the common problems <br/> seen in this population (e.g. increased infectious disease such as <br/> gastroenteritis) and protection against later chronic diseases such as <br/> cancer and diabetes. As recognized by the Healthy People 2010 objectives, <br/> the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Dietetic Association, <br/> interventions to promote and support breastfeeding in such vulnerable <br/> populations are needed. The purpose of this paper is to provide a state of <br/> the science synthesis on factors of importance in predicting breastfeeding <br/> initiation and duration, characteristics of breastfeeding experiences, and <br/> health care provider attitudes and practices in supporting breastfeeding <br/> in this population. Current intervention research to promote and support <br/> breastfeeding initiation and duration will be described. In addition, <br/> suggestions for health policy will be presented with special emphasis on <br/> school-based support of teens wishing to return to school and continue <br/> breastfeeding their infants. Nurse researchers and clinicians are <br/> important in the continuing quest to improve the health of American <br/> mothers and their children. Breastfeeding promotion and support in this <br/> vulnerable population is integral to health promotion strategies for the <br/> nation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:45:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:45:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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