A Longitudinal Study of Changes in Depression and Hypertension in Urban African American Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159165
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Longitudinal Study of Changes in Depression and Hypertension in Urban African American Adults
Abstract:
A Longitudinal Study of Changes in Depression and Hypertension in Urban African American Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Washington, Olivia, PhD, APRN, BC, LPC
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Geriatric Nursing, 5557 Cass Ave., Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:(313) 577-4142
Co-Authors:Nancy T. Artinian, PhD, RN, BC, FAHA, Professor; John M. Flack, MD, MPH, Associate Director; Kai-lin Cathy Jen, PhD, Professor; Peter Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP, Director
Purpose: People with major depression are four times more likely to
have heart attacks than the general population, while those with a history
of mild depression have twice the chance. African-Americans historically
have been underdiagnosed for depression, less likely to report depressive
symptoms, or receive treatment to alleviate those symptoms. The purpose of
this study was to determine if participation in a year-long study could
reduce blood pressure readings and depressive symptoms in a sample of 198
urban African Americans.
Conceptual Framework: The vascular depression theory guided this study.
Participants: The volunteer sample included 70 men and 128 women with a
mean age of 59.72 (sd=13.13) years. The majority of participants was
unmarried, unemployed, earned less than $20,000 per year, and had at least
a high school education.
Methods: A longitudinal research design was used, with data on blood
pressure readings and symptoms of depression (Center for Epidemiological
Studies-Depression: CES-D) collected using structured interviews and
physical examinations. Analysis included descriptive statistics and
repeated measures ANOVA.
Preliminary Findings: Mean baseline blood pressure readings were 156.19
(SD=22.38) mm Hg systolic and 89.55 (SD=13.61) mm Hg diastolic at
baseline, with decreases noted at 3- month follow-up for both systolic
(M=146.47, SD=18.65) and diastolic blood pressure (M=83.74, SD=12.07). At
6-month follow-up, systolic (M=144.69, SD=20.50) and diastolic (M=83.68,
SD=12.59) decreased. Results of repeated measures ANOVA indicated that
decreases across the three measurement periods were significant. Mean
scores for the CES-D decreased significantly from baseline (M=12.55,
SD=11.53) to 3-month follow-up (M=8.23, SD=9.58), with a further decrease
noted at 6-month follow-up (M=5.18, SD=7.26).
Conclusions: Involvement in a randomized control trial that monitors blood
pressure helped participants reduce their blood pressure and depression.
Findings may be similar to a Hawthorne effect, indicating that improvement
was due to attention participants received during the study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Longitudinal Study of Changes in Depression and Hypertension in Urban African American Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159165-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Longitudinal Study of Changes in Depression and Hypertension in Urban African American Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Washington, Olivia, PhD, APRN, BC, LPC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Geriatric Nursing, 5557 Cass Ave., Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(313) 577-4142</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">o.washington@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy T. Artinian, PhD, RN, BC, FAHA, Professor; John M. Flack, MD, MPH, Associate Director; Kai-lin Cathy Jen, PhD, Professor; Peter Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: People with major depression are four times more likely to <br/> have heart attacks than the general population, while those with a history <br/> of mild depression have twice the chance. African-Americans historically <br/> have been underdiagnosed for depression, less likely to report depressive <br/> symptoms, or receive treatment to alleviate those symptoms. The purpose of <br/> this study was to determine if participation in a year-long study could <br/> reduce blood pressure readings and depressive symptoms in a sample of 198 <br/> urban African Americans.<br/> Conceptual Framework: The vascular depression theory guided this study.<br/> Participants: The volunteer sample included 70 men and 128 women with a <br/> mean age of 59.72 (sd=13.13) years. The majority of participants was <br/> unmarried, unemployed, earned less than $20,000 per year, and had at least <br/> a high school education.<br/> Methods: A longitudinal research design was used, with data on blood <br/> pressure readings and symptoms of depression (Center for Epidemiological <br/> Studies-Depression: CES-D) collected using structured interviews and <br/> physical examinations. Analysis included descriptive statistics and <br/> repeated measures ANOVA.<br/> Preliminary Findings: Mean baseline blood pressure readings were 156.19 <br/> (SD=22.38) mm Hg systolic and 89.55 (SD=13.61) mm Hg diastolic at <br/> baseline, with decreases noted at 3- month follow-up for both systolic <br/> (M=146.47, SD=18.65) and diastolic blood pressure (M=83.74, SD=12.07). At <br/> 6-month follow-up, systolic (M=144.69, SD=20.50) and diastolic (M=83.68, <br/> SD=12.59) decreased. Results of repeated measures ANOVA indicated that <br/> decreases across the three measurement periods were significant. Mean <br/> scores for the CES-D decreased significantly from baseline (M=12.55, <br/> SD=11.53) to 3-month follow-up (M=8.23, SD=9.58), with a further decrease <br/> noted at 6-month follow-up (M=5.18, SD=7.26). <br/> Conclusions: Involvement in a randomized control trial that monitors blood <br/> pressure helped participants reduce their blood pressure and depression. <br/> Findings may be similar to a Hawthorne effect, indicating that improvement <br/> was due to attention participants received during the study. <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:46:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:46:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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