2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159166
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression and It's Predictors Among Arab American Youth, 14 to 18 Years of Age
Abstract:
Depression and It's Predictors Among Arab American Youth, 14 to 18 Years of Age
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Weglicki, Linda, PhD, MSN, RN, ABPP
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Engineering, 5557 Cass Avenue, 368 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.5502
Co-Authors:Virginia Rice, PhD, RN and Thomas Templin, PhD, Associate Professor
Problem: Over 8% of adolescents in the U.S. suffer from depression.
Each year one in five high school students contemplate suicide, over
400,000 attempt suicide, and suicide is the third leading cause of death.
There is little to no literature that addresses depression in Arab
American (ArA) youth, a growing population in the U.S. and of special
interest, since the events of September 11, 2001. This sample was derived
from a larger study exploring tobacco use in ArA youth. Theoretical
Framework: The Adolescent Tobacco Use Model designed to identify
moderating and mediating forces found to influence tobacco use in
adolescents was used to guide the larger study. Methodology/Design: A
sample of 1,297 (647 males and 650 females), 14 to 18 year old ArA,
completed a number of measures including the Center for Epidemiologic
Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), a self-report scale measuring depressive
symptomatology, in this community-based study. A two-factor model of
depression was used - Depressive Affect and Negative Outlook. Each factor
was examined separately. Results: Multiple linear regression accounted for
35% of the variance in the Depressive Affect factor with 8 predictors.
Primary predictors were self-esteem, adolescent hassles, and poor
perceived health. Current cigarette smoking was a significant predictor
but accounted for only .5% additional variance. The model accounted for
17% of the variance in the Negative Outlook factor with three
predictorsùself-esteem, studentÆs age, and poor perceived health. ArA
males scored lower on Depressive Affect and Negative Outlook (M=13.39;
SD=11.09; M=18.92; SD=13.48, respectively) than ArA females (M=15.19;
SD=11.77; M=19.47; SD=13.25, respectively). Interpretation/Relevancy: The
model was more successful in predicting depression than negative outlook
with the combination of high hassles and low self-esteem predicting
depression but not negative outlook. These results underscore the value in
distinguishing distinct CES-D dimensions in screening depression Arabic
youth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression and It's Predictors Among Arab American Youth, 14 to 18 Years of Ageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159166-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression and It's Predictors Among Arab American Youth, 14 to 18 Years of Age</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weglicki, Linda, PhD, MSN, RN, ABPP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Engineering, 5557 Cass Avenue, 368 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.5502</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lweglicki@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Virginia Rice, PhD, RN and Thomas Templin, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Over 8% of adolescents in the U.S. suffer from depression. <br/> Each year one in five high school students contemplate suicide, over <br/> 400,000 attempt suicide, and suicide is the third leading cause of death. <br/> There is little to no literature that addresses depression in Arab <br/> American (ArA) youth, a growing population in the U.S. and of special <br/> interest, since the events of September 11, 2001. This sample was derived <br/> from a larger study exploring tobacco use in ArA youth. Theoretical <br/> Framework: The Adolescent Tobacco Use Model designed to identify <br/> moderating and mediating forces found to influence tobacco use in <br/> adolescents was used to guide the larger study. Methodology/Design: A <br/> sample of 1,297 (647 males and 650 females), 14 to 18 year old ArA, <br/> completed a number of measures including the Center for Epidemiologic <br/> Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), a self-report scale measuring depressive <br/> symptomatology, in this community-based study. A two-factor model of <br/> depression was used - Depressive Affect and Negative Outlook. Each factor <br/> was examined separately. Results: Multiple linear regression accounted for <br/> 35% of the variance in the Depressive Affect factor with 8 predictors. <br/> Primary predictors were self-esteem, adolescent hassles, and poor <br/> perceived health. Current cigarette smoking was a significant predictor <br/> but accounted for only .5% additional variance. The model accounted for <br/> 17% of the variance in the Negative Outlook factor with three <br/> predictors&ugrave;self-esteem, student&AElig;s age, and poor perceived health. ArA <br/> males scored lower on Depressive Affect and Negative Outlook (M=13.39; <br/> SD=11.09; M=18.92; SD=13.48, respectively) than ArA females (M=15.19; <br/> SD=11.77; M=19.47; SD=13.25, respectively). Interpretation/Relevancy: The <br/> model was more successful in predicting depression than negative outlook <br/> with the combination of high hassles and low self-esteem predicting <br/> depression but not negative outlook. These results underscore the value in <br/> distinguishing distinct CES-D dimensions in screening depression Arabic <br/> youth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:46:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:46:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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