2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159171
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Resource Utilization and Outcomes for Obese Patients in the ICU
Abstract:
Resource Utilization and Outcomes for Obese Patients in the ICU
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Winkelman, Chris, PhD, CNP, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44109, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368-0700
Problem/Purpose: Caring for obese patients in intensive care units
(ICU) is challenging. There are limited data about how nurses care for
this vulnerable population. This study describes the nursing resources and
patient outcomes in obese, critically ill patients. Methods: Patients with
a body mass index (BMI)over 30 kg/m2 were identified by advanced practice
nurses (APN) in four facilities to provide cross-sectional data about
equipment/personnel resources and patient outcomes. Results: Our patient
sample (n=47) had a mean BMI of 47 kg/m2 and was typically female (65%),
Caucasian (79%), aged 56 (range 23-83), admitted with a cardio/pulmonary
diagnosis (63%) and APACHE II score of 13; they averaged 4 days in the
ICU. Use of specialized equipment was associated with patients with a BMI
greater than 40kg/m2. Most participants (63%) required 2 or more staff to
assist with positioning. One-third of the participants required 2 or more
attempts to obtain intravenous/arterial access. Ten patients (23%)
received special skin care, although the incidence of pressure ulcer
occurrence was low (5%). 24 patients (56%) required mechanical
ventilation; 5 (12%) were ventilated for 3 or more days. Respiratory
complications occurred in 21% of the sample. Other complications included
new cardiac problems (13%), DVT (2%) and line dislodgement (9%). Nearly
all patients survived (98%). Graphically, complications were more likely
to be associated with increasing BMI rather than resource use.
Conclusions: In general, this sample is younger, female, and less severely
ill on admission than the typical ICU patient. Additional staff/staff time
and specialized equipment were more likely to be used for patients with a
BMI of more than 40 kg/m2. Outcomes were better than expected from reports
in the literature; this may be due to the involvement of APNs involved in
the care of obese patients in this study. Funding: Frances Payne Bolton
School of Nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResource Utilization and Outcomes for Obese Patients in the ICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159171-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Resource Utilization and Outcomes for Obese Patients in the ICU</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winkelman, Chris, PhD, CNP, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368-0700</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chris.winkelman@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem/Purpose: Caring for obese patients in intensive care units <br/> (ICU) is challenging. There are limited data about how nurses care for <br/> this vulnerable population. This study describes the nursing resources and <br/> patient outcomes in obese, critically ill patients. Methods: Patients with <br/> a body mass index (BMI)over 30 kg/m2 were identified by advanced practice <br/> nurses (APN) in four facilities to provide cross-sectional data about <br/> equipment/personnel resources and patient outcomes. Results: Our patient <br/> sample (n=47) had a mean BMI of 47 kg/m2 and was typically female (65%), <br/> Caucasian (79%), aged 56 (range 23-83), admitted with a cardio/pulmonary <br/> diagnosis (63%) and APACHE II score of 13; they averaged 4 days in the <br/> ICU. Use of specialized equipment was associated with patients with a BMI <br/> greater than 40kg/m2. Most participants (63%) required 2 or more staff to <br/> assist with positioning. One-third of the participants required 2 or more <br/> attempts to obtain intravenous/arterial access. Ten patients (23%) <br/> received special skin care, although the incidence of pressure ulcer <br/> occurrence was low (5%). 24 patients (56%) required mechanical <br/> ventilation; 5 (12%) were ventilated for 3 or more days. Respiratory <br/> complications occurred in 21% of the sample. Other complications included <br/> new cardiac problems (13%), DVT (2%) and line dislodgement (9%). Nearly <br/> all patients survived (98%). Graphically, complications were more likely <br/> to be associated with increasing BMI rather than resource use. <br/> Conclusions: In general, this sample is younger, female, and less severely <br/> ill on admission than the typical ICU patient. Additional staff/staff time <br/> and specialized equipment were more likely to be used for patients with a <br/> BMI of more than 40 kg/m2. Outcomes were better than expected from reports <br/> in the literature; this may be due to the involvement of APNs involved in <br/> the care of obese patients in this study. Funding: Frances Payne Bolton <br/> School of Nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:46:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:46:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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