The effect of an alternative therapy (music therapy) on adults with chronic low back pain.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159173
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effect of an alternative therapy (music therapy) on adults with chronic low back pain.
Abstract:
The effect of an alternative therapy (music therapy) on adults with chronic low back pain.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wooldridge, Shelley, Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:Spalding University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 129 Ridge Crest Court, Shepherdsville, KY, 40165, USA
Contact Telephone:502-921-1906
Co-Authors:Katie Rogers and Becky Tatum
Problem: Chronic low back pain is a very common problem in the United States, and analgesics are not always effective. Although music therapy has been shown to reduce pain, limited research specifically on individuals with chronic low back pain exists. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an alternative therapy (music therapy) on the management of pain, in outpatient adults 18 years or older with chronic low back pain with a duration of six months or greater. Subjects: A non-probability sample (N=23) of individuals with chronic low back pain was selected from a "Pain Clinic" within a suburb of a southern state. Methodology: A randomized, experimental study was used with an experimental pre-test post-test design. The tool was the McGill Pain Questionnaire, modified by the investigators. Consent was obtained prior to participation. Theoretical Framework: Dorothy Orem's Self Care Deficit Nursing Theory guided this study. Findings: Findings were based on two hypotheses: a) music therapy will decrease the perception of chronic low back pain in adults 18 years and older as compared to adults who do not use music therapy, and; b) by increasing the individual's knowledge to perform self-care using music therapy, their ability to manage their chronic low back pain will be enhanced. Both hypotheses were statistically insignificant. Analysis revealed a trend indicating that music decreased pain; the small sample size inhibited any significance. Implications: Music decreases pain, is a form of self-care, and should be considered as an intervention for pain management and reduction. This study needs to be replicated using a larger sample size and an alternative method for obtaining post-test questionnaires. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effect of an alternative therapy (music therapy) on adults with chronic low back pain.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159173-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The effect of an alternative therapy (music therapy) on adults with chronic low back pain.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wooldridge, Shelley, Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Spalding University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 129 Ridge Crest Court, Shepherdsville, KY, 40165, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">502-921-1906</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shelleywooldridge803@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Katie Rogers and Becky Tatum</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Chronic low back pain is a very common problem in the United States, and analgesics are not always effective. Although music therapy has been shown to reduce pain, limited research specifically on individuals with chronic low back pain exists. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an alternative therapy (music therapy) on the management of pain, in outpatient adults 18 years or older with chronic low back pain with a duration of six months or greater. Subjects: A non-probability sample (N=23) of individuals with chronic low back pain was selected from a &quot;Pain Clinic&quot; within a suburb of a southern state. Methodology: A randomized, experimental study was used with an experimental pre-test post-test design. The tool was the McGill Pain Questionnaire, modified by the investigators. Consent was obtained prior to participation. Theoretical Framework: Dorothy Orem's Self Care Deficit Nursing Theory guided this study. Findings: Findings were based on two hypotheses: a) music therapy will decrease the perception of chronic low back pain in adults 18 years and older as compared to adults who do not use music therapy, and; b) by increasing the individual's knowledge to perform self-care using music therapy, their ability to manage their chronic low back pain will be enhanced. Both hypotheses were statistically insignificant. Analysis revealed a trend indicating that music decreased pain; the small sample size inhibited any significance. Implications: Music decreases pain, is a form of self-care, and should be considered as an intervention for pain management and reduction. This study needs to be replicated using a larger sample size and an alternative method for obtaining post-test questionnaires. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:46:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:46:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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