Use of Sensor System Data for Early Detection of Health Status Changes in Older Adult Residents of a Retirement Community

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159178
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Sensor System Data for Early Detection of Health Status Changes in Older Adult Residents of a Retirement Community
Abstract:
Use of Sensor System Data for Early Detection of Health Status Changes in Older Adult Residents of a Retirement Community
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Aud, Myra, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Contact Address:MU Sinclair School of Nursing, School of Nursing Building - S422, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Co-Authors:G. Alexander and M.J. Rantz, MU Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO; and M. Skubic, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO
Purpose: Case study methods are being used to investigate congruence of sensor system reports with actual health status changes experienced by three residents of a retirement community. Specific questions are: Does sensor data reviewed retrospectively correspond to symptomatology reported by the residents to staff and families? and Did the sensor data contain preliminary signs of health status changes from resident baseline sensor data? Background: Sensor systems were placed in selected apartment units at a retirement community as part of a multi-year, interdisciplinary project funded by the NSF (Technology Interventions for Elders with Mobility and Cognitive Impairments). Three residents with sensor systems were hospitalized shortly after the sensors were installed and baseline sensor data obtained. Methods: The participants in the purposive sample are older adult residents of a retirement community and their family representatives. Data sources include sensor data, home care agency records, and interviews with residents and family members. The sensor data detects and quantifies everyday activities within residents' apartment such as walking from room to room, working in the kitchen, and sitting in a favorite chair in the living room plus data on pulse, respiration, and restlessness while in bed. Home care agency records provide baseline and ongoing data about resident health status. Interviews with residents and family members provide detailed information about the health status changes that preceded hospitalization. Results: Preliminary interview findings demonstrate positive attitudes toward use of sensors that collect data for early detection of health status changes. There was great interest in output that potentially detects gait changes, falls, and changes in pulse and respiration while asleep. Discussion: Sensor systems that continuously and unobtrusively measure daily activities and detect variance from baseline could potentially alert older adults and their care providers to early signs of health status changes before scheduled periodic assessments by health care professionals detect such changes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Sensor System Data for Early Detection of Health Status Changes in Older Adult Residents of a Retirement Communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159178-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Sensor System Data for Early Detection of Health Status Changes in Older Adult Residents of a Retirement Community</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Aud, Myra, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MU Sinclair School of Nursing, School of Nursing Building - S422, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">audm@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">G. Alexander and M.J. Rantz, MU Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO; and M. Skubic, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Case study methods are being used to investigate congruence of sensor system reports with actual health status changes experienced by three residents of a retirement community. Specific questions are: Does sensor data reviewed retrospectively correspond to symptomatology reported by the residents to staff and families? and Did the sensor data contain preliminary signs of health status changes from resident baseline sensor data? Background: Sensor systems were placed in selected apartment units at a retirement community as part of a multi-year, interdisciplinary project funded by the NSF (Technology Interventions for Elders with Mobility and Cognitive Impairments). Three residents with sensor systems were hospitalized shortly after the sensors were installed and baseline sensor data obtained. Methods: The participants in the purposive sample are older adult residents of a retirement community and their family representatives. Data sources include sensor data, home care agency records, and interviews with residents and family members. The sensor data detects and quantifies everyday activities within residents' apartment such as walking from room to room, working in the kitchen, and sitting in a favorite chair in the living room plus data on pulse, respiration, and restlessness while in bed. Home care agency records provide baseline and ongoing data about resident health status. Interviews with residents and family members provide detailed information about the health status changes that preceded hospitalization. Results: Preliminary interview findings demonstrate positive attitudes toward use of sensors that collect data for early detection of health status changes. There was great interest in output that potentially detects gait changes, falls, and changes in pulse and respiration while asleep. Discussion: Sensor systems that continuously and unobtrusively measure daily activities and detect variance from baseline could potentially alert older adults and their care providers to early signs of health status changes before scheduled periodic assessments by health care professionals detect such changes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:46:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:46:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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