Reasons Most Often Cited Why Students Do Not Participate in On-line Course Evaluations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159183
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reasons Most Often Cited Why Students Do Not Participate in On-line Course Evaluations
Abstract:
Reasons Most Often Cited Why Students Do Not Participate in On-line Course Evaluations
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 14107 Independence St, Basehor, KS, 66007, USA
Co-Authors:M. Brewer, J. Neuberger, and K. Rock, School of Nursing, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS
One goal of nursing faculty is to continually improve their courses. Course evaluations are one means to improve courses and are also used by researchers to examine innovative teaching methods. Although many schools have converted to on-line course evaluations, generally the response rate for on-line course evaluation is lower than paper-and-pencil evaluations. For example, two of the authors have recently had 8-13% response rates on course evaluations. Very little literature could be found addressing these low response rates. Therefore, the specific aim of this study was to determine reasons that undergraduate nursing students cite for not participating in on-line course evaluations and what suggestions students can offer for increasing the response rate. The design of this study was a descriptive, cross-sectional survey, which was developed by the research team and reviewed by an expert panel. After IRB approval, senior BSN students enrolled in a Nursing Research course were asked to participate. Time was given in class to complete the survey, with 104 out of 109 students (97 females, 7 males) participating (95% response rate). A $5 Starbucks gift card was given after completion of the survey Findings: Employment in the past year correlated positively with preferring online evaluations (p=0.5). 78% said they (usually or always) completed online evaluations, while 70% said they completed paper-pen evaluations. 65% said they preferred on-line over paper-pen. Reasons given were: complete on own time, easier, and quicker. More students said they were likely to complete evaluations when they disliked a course (86.6%) compared to when they liked a course (73%). But they said they were equally as likely to complete evaluations if they distrusted (85.5%) or respected the instructor (85.6%). Most frequently cited reasons for not completing on-line evaluations were forget to do them (76%), too many evaluations (68.3%), too long (25%) and too many items (21%). Recommendations for improving response rates were give class time, give points, and make them mandatory.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReasons Most Often Cited Why Students Do Not Participate in On-line Course Evaluationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159183-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reasons Most Often Cited Why Students Do Not Participate in On-line Course Evaluations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 14107 Independence St, Basehor, KS, 66007, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lconnelly@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Brewer, J. Neuberger, and K. Rock, School of Nursing, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">One goal of nursing faculty is to continually improve their courses. Course evaluations are one means to improve courses and are also used by researchers to examine innovative teaching methods. Although many schools have converted to on-line course evaluations, generally the response rate for on-line course evaluation is lower than paper-and-pencil evaluations. For example, two of the authors have recently had 8-13% response rates on course evaluations. Very little literature could be found addressing these low response rates. Therefore, the specific aim of this study was to determine reasons that undergraduate nursing students cite for not participating in on-line course evaluations and what suggestions students can offer for increasing the response rate. The design of this study was a descriptive, cross-sectional survey, which was developed by the research team and reviewed by an expert panel. After IRB approval, senior BSN students enrolled in a Nursing Research course were asked to participate. Time was given in class to complete the survey, with 104 out of 109 students (97 females, 7 males) participating (95% response rate). A $5 Starbucks gift card was given after completion of the survey Findings: Employment in the past year correlated positively with preferring online evaluations (p=0.5). 78% said they (usually or always) completed online evaluations, while 70% said they completed paper-pen evaluations. 65% said they preferred on-line over paper-pen. Reasons given were: complete on own time, easier, and quicker. More students said they were likely to complete evaluations when they disliked a course (86.6%) compared to when they liked a course (73%). But they said they were equally as likely to complete evaluations if they distrusted (85.5%) or respected the instructor (85.6%). Most frequently cited reasons for not completing on-line evaluations were forget to do them (76%), too many evaluations (68.3%), too long (25%) and too many items (21%). Recommendations for improving response rates were give class time, give points, and make them mandatory.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:47:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:47:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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