2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159193
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Experiences in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancers
Abstract:
Symptom Experiences in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Finnegan, Lorna, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:College of Nursing - MC 802, 845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:D. Wilkie, C. Ferrans, and J. Wilbur, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; and R. Campbell, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
Aim: Forty years ago, a diagnosis of cancer in a child was a death sentence. Today, survival rates for most childhood cancers exceed 78%, producing a cohort living with late-effects of treatment. These late effects challenge survivors of childhood cancers to cope with chronic illnesses and multiple symptoms as they transition to young adulthood and beyond. While acute symptoms and symptom management have long been recognized as essential components of the cancer care trajectory, very few studies have explored the late symptom experiences of young adult survivors of childhood cancers. The purpose of this study was to describe symptom experiences in young adult survivors of childhood cancer and examine relationships among symptom frequency, severity, and distress. Methods: The Symptom Experience dimension of the Symptom Management Model guided this descriptive, cross-sectional study. The 117 young adult (ages 18-37) survivors throughout the United States responded to a web-based survey that contained measures of symptom occurrence, frequency, severity, and distress (32-item Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale). Results: Participants were 95% Caucasian, 10% Hispanic/Latino, mostly female (68%), and well educated (88% completed at least some college). Sixty-three per cent of the respondents were leukemia or lymphoma survivors. Over half (54%) of the sample reported at least one treatment-related late effect. Years since completion of treatment ranged from 2-32 (mean 11.2, SD, 5.9). The five most prevalent symptoms (in order of frequency) were: feeling drowsy, pain, lack of energy, difficulty sleeping, and worrying. Relationships among symptom frequency, severity, and distress varied for each of these symptoms. Correlations ranged from: 0.58 to 0.78 for severity and frequency; 0.45 to 0.80 for frequency and distress; and, 0.44 to 0.89 for severity and distress. Conclusions: Young adult survivors of childhood cancers are experiencing multiple concurrent symptoms with varying levels of frequency, severity, and distress many years after they completed treatment. Future studies should focus on common pathways among multiple symptoms that may reveal symptom clusters.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Experiences in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159193-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Experiences in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Finnegan, Lorna, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing - MC 802, 845 S. Damen, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lornaf@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D. Wilkie, C. Ferrans, and J. Wilbur, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; and R. Campbell, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: Forty years ago, a diagnosis of cancer in a child was a death sentence. Today, survival rates for most childhood cancers exceed 78%, producing a cohort living with late-effects of treatment. These late effects challenge survivors of childhood cancers to cope with chronic illnesses and multiple symptoms as they transition to young adulthood and beyond. While acute symptoms and symptom management have long been recognized as essential components of the cancer care trajectory, very few studies have explored the late symptom experiences of young adult survivors of childhood cancers. The purpose of this study was to describe symptom experiences in young adult survivors of childhood cancer and examine relationships among symptom frequency, severity, and distress. Methods: The Symptom Experience dimension of the Symptom Management Model guided this descriptive, cross-sectional study. The 117 young adult (ages 18-37) survivors throughout the United States responded to a web-based survey that contained measures of symptom occurrence, frequency, severity, and distress (32-item Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale). Results: Participants were 95% Caucasian, 10% Hispanic/Latino, mostly female (68%), and well educated (88% completed at least some college). Sixty-three per cent of the respondents were leukemia or lymphoma survivors. Over half (54%) of the sample reported at least one treatment-related late effect. Years since completion of treatment ranged from 2-32 (mean 11.2, SD, 5.9). The five most prevalent symptoms (in order of frequency) were: feeling drowsy, pain, lack of energy, difficulty sleeping, and worrying. Relationships among symptom frequency, severity, and distress varied for each of these symptoms. Correlations ranged from: 0.58 to 0.78 for severity and frequency; 0.45 to 0.80 for frequency and distress; and, 0.44 to 0.89 for severity and distress. Conclusions: Young adult survivors of childhood cancers are experiencing multiple concurrent symptoms with varying levels of frequency, severity, and distress many years after they completed treatment. Future studies should focus on common pathways among multiple symptoms that may reveal symptom clusters.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:47:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:47:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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