2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159194
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Predictors of Toddler Health
Abstract:
Maternal Predictors of Toddler Health
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Fowles, Eileen, PhD, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Austin
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1700 Red River Street, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA
The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships among maternal biopsychosocial variables in the first six months postpartum and child's health at 18 months and to identify maternal predictors of toddler health. A secondary analysis was conducted. Information from the original study used in this analysis include: demographic information, health behaviors, psychosocial factors, and child health status at 18 months of age. Women (N = 104, mean age 26 years old, SD = 5.0 years) were primarily Anglo (97%), married or partnered (97%), had vaginal births (77%) and were not breastfeeding (76%) 6 months after delivery. 45 of the referent children were boys, 59 were girls, were 28 weeks old (SD = 5.0 weeks) at Time 1 and 19 months old (SD = 1.2 months) at Time 2. At Time 1, 45% of the women had returned to work either full-time (25%) or part-time (20%). There was a significant difference between women's preferred and actual work status (x2 = 4.27, df = 1, p < .04). Mothers who preferred not to work at T1 perceived the toddler as healthier at T-2 (t = 2.256, p < .03) Toddler health varied with the number of hours that the baby was in non-parental care at T-1 [F (3, 100) = 2.736, p. < .05] and at T2 [F (3, 100) = 6.78, p. < .000]. Toddlers in non-parental care >21 hours per week were less healthy than others. Maternal stress was negatively related to maternal health behaviors (r = -.574), hopefulness (r = -.576) , maternal confidence (r = -.576) at six months postpartum. Toddler health status at T2 was negatively related to maternal stress (r = -.28, p = .004), and maternal body mass index [BMI] at T1 (r = -.233, p = .019). Maternal stress and BMI at T1 predicted 12% of the variance in child health status at 18 months of age [F (2, 95) = 6.64, p = .002]. Mother's work status contributed to poorer child health, i.e., children who spend more than 20 hours/week in non-parental care and thus exposed to increased exposure to other children's illnesses, have poorer health than children staying at home more. Early high levels of stress may reflect the struggles of working women because of employment and out-of-home child care that then affects child health status.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Predictors of Toddler Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159194-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Predictors of Toddler Health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fowles, Eileen, PhD, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1700 Red River Street, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">efowles@mail.nur.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract"> The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships among maternal biopsychosocial variables in the first six months postpartum and child's health at 18 months and to identify maternal predictors of toddler health. A secondary analysis was conducted. Information from the original study used in this analysis include: demographic information, health behaviors, psychosocial factors, and child health status at 18 months of age. Women (N = 104, mean age 26 years old, SD = 5.0 years) were primarily Anglo (97%), married or partnered (97%), had vaginal births (77%) and were not breastfeeding (76%) 6 months after delivery. 45 of the referent children were boys, 59 were girls, were 28 weeks old (SD = 5.0 weeks) at Time 1 and 19 months old (SD = 1.2 months) at Time 2. At Time 1, 45% of the women had returned to work either full-time (25%) or part-time (20%). There was a significant difference between women's preferred and actual work status (x2 = 4.27, df = 1, p &lt; .04). Mothers who preferred not to work at T1 perceived the toddler as healthier at T-2 (t = 2.256, p &lt; .03) Toddler health varied with the number of hours that the baby was in non-parental care at T-1 [F (3, 100) = 2.736, p. &lt; .05] and at T2 [F (3, 100) = 6.78, p. &lt; .000]. Toddlers in non-parental care &gt;21 hours per week were less healthy than others. Maternal stress was negatively related to maternal health behaviors (r = -.574), hopefulness (r = -.576) , maternal confidence (r = -.576) at six months postpartum. Toddler health status at T2 was negatively related to maternal stress (r = -.28, p = .004), and maternal body mass index [BMI] at T1 (r = -.233, p = .019). Maternal stress and BMI at T1 predicted 12% of the variance in child health status at 18 months of age [F (2, 95) = 6.64, p = .002]. Mother's work status contributed to poorer child health, i.e., children who spend more than 20 hours/week in non-parental care and thus exposed to increased exposure to other children's illnesses, have poorer health than children staying at home more. Early high levels of stress may reflect the struggles of working women because of employment and out-of-home child care that then affects child health status.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:47:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:47:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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