Our Lives, Our Voice, Our Wisdom: The Experience of African American Women Living with Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159196
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Our Lives, Our Voice, Our Wisdom: The Experience of African American Women Living with Diabetes
Abstract:
Our Lives, Our Voice, Our Wisdom: The Experience of African American Women Living with Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Guillaume, Berline
P.I. Institution Name:College of Saint Catherine
Contact Address:, Saint Paul, MN, 55106, USA
Co-Authors:V. Akoh and M. Pharris, Nursing, College of Saint Catherine, Saint Paul, MN; P. White, , North Point Health & Wellness Center, Minneapolis, MN
Problem Statement: The experiences and perspectives of African American women living with diabetes have not been fully understood to guide meaningful practice. Theoretical Framework: Newman's theory of health as expanding consciousness was used to guide this community based collaborative action research. Methodology: Seven African American women with type 2 diabetes were recruited through a health clinic and fliers. Interviews were conducted until a full understanding of the pattern of meaningful events was reached. Participant recruitment continued until no new themes were found. Data were analyzed and woven into a spoken word narrative, which was performed for the larger community of African women with diabetes to engage in a dialogue to deepen the understanding of women's experiences and envision potential actions for health. Results: Compared to conventional thought, listening to the stories of the women revealed the importance of several unconventional factors. Extreme life stressors, depression, trauma and the lack of sister friends permeated in these women's stories. The rise and fall of stress and trauma paralleled the rise and fall of blood sugars. As women encountered extreme life stressors they became depressed and looked to God. Strong faith was a double-edged sword. God was seen as the source of all things, including diabetes, which rendered a sense of powerlessness; and God was seen as a source of strength and hope in overcoming life's stresses. Women described a need for further knowledge, and for mentors to encourage and support them to develop their skills and gifts. A caring nurse was seen as helpful. Community dialogue about what is meaningful in living with diabetes gives insight into increasing individual and community health. Relevance to Nursing: When nurses dialogue with people to understand the experience of living with a chronic disease in the context of the entire pattern of what is meaningful in their lives, new insights arise into how individuals and communities can live and relate in healthier ways. This gives rise to a different model of nursing care and community health organization. Key Words: African American women, diabetes, health as expanding consciousness
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOur Lives, Our Voice, Our Wisdom: The Experience of African American Women Living with Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159196-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Our Lives, Our Voice, Our Wisdom: The Experience of African American Women Living with Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guillaume, Berline</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of Saint Catherine</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Saint Paul, MN, 55106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bguillaume@stkate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">V. Akoh and M. Pharris, Nursing, College of Saint Catherine, Saint Paul, MN; P. White, , North Point Health &amp; Wellness Center, Minneapolis, MN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: The experiences and perspectives of African American women living with diabetes have not been fully understood to guide meaningful practice. Theoretical Framework: Newman's theory of health as expanding consciousness was used to guide this community based collaborative action research. Methodology: Seven African American women with type 2 diabetes were recruited through a health clinic and fliers. Interviews were conducted until a full understanding of the pattern of meaningful events was reached. Participant recruitment continued until no new themes were found. Data were analyzed and woven into a spoken word narrative, which was performed for the larger community of African women with diabetes to engage in a dialogue to deepen the understanding of women's experiences and envision potential actions for health. Results: Compared to conventional thought, listening to the stories of the women revealed the importance of several unconventional factors. Extreme life stressors, depression, trauma and the lack of sister friends permeated in these women's stories. The rise and fall of stress and trauma paralleled the rise and fall of blood sugars. As women encountered extreme life stressors they became depressed and looked to God. Strong faith was a double-edged sword. God was seen as the source of all things, including diabetes, which rendered a sense of powerlessness; and God was seen as a source of strength and hope in overcoming life's stresses. Women described a need for further knowledge, and for mentors to encourage and support them to develop their skills and gifts. A caring nurse was seen as helpful. Community dialogue about what is meaningful in living with diabetes gives insight into increasing individual and community health. Relevance to Nursing: When nurses dialogue with people to understand the experience of living with a chronic disease in the context of the entire pattern of what is meaningful in their lives, new insights arise into how individuals and communities can live and relate in healthier ways. This gives rise to a different model of nursing care and community health organization. Key Words: African American women, diabetes, health as expanding consciousness</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:47:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:47:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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