2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159198
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Predictive Model of Disability Related Outcomes of Pulmonary Rehabilitation
Abstract:
A Predictive Model of Disability Related Outcomes of Pulmonary Rehabilitation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hassanein, Salwa, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kaiser Permanente
Contact Address:Division of Research, Cleveland, OH, 44120, USA
Co-Authors:L.S. Gittner, Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland, OH; G. Narsavage, School of Nursing, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA
Purpose: Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) programs improve functional status, exercise performance, and quality of life and decrease dyspnea, in individuals with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The study determined in an adult population with COPD the known contextual factors, resources, and barriers that can be identified on initial assessment to predict consistent attendance (PR dose effect) and disability-related outcomes experienced during PR programs. Conceptual Framework: Stuifbergen's Conceptual Model of QOL for People with Disabling Conditions (1995) was used to guide this retrospective record analysis using a descriptive predictive design. Method: Records of community dwelling adults with COPD who completed the PR program at a Midwestern Medical Center from 2000 to 2005 were included. Sample: There were 32 males and 72 females, mean age of 59.9 (SD=19.10), a mean FEV1 of 46.45% predicted (SD=20.1), and a mean FVC % predicted of 67.61(SD=16.61), FEV1/FVC % mean ratio was 51.15% predicted (SD=18.17), and mean RV was 150.66% predicted (SD= 67.01), indicating a population with moderate to severe obstructive lung disease. All were retired or unemployed, and 99% were on oxygen during exercise. Results: Independent variables of current smoking (Beta= -.36); male gender (Beta = .19); not having Emphysema (Beta = -.27); FVC% (Beta =.32), and number of selected co-morbidities (Beta =-.20) were significant predictors of attendance at (dose of) PR. PR dose predicted disability-related outcomes of metabolic level (Beta =.31) and dyspnea (Beta =.26) in the last PR session. The PR program acted as a mediator between predictors of age, BMI, activity level, numbers of selected co-morbidities and outcomes. Conclusion: The findings support the availability of information on factors that predict attendance at a PR program, the negative effects of current smoking, and that PR attendance (dose effect) mediates improvements in metabolic level and mental status. Nurses should assess patients for risk for PR non-attendance and address characteristics of time and perception of value that can be changed; smoking cessation could become a requirement before initiating activity in a PR program, and PR outcome measures should capture dyspnea and functional status.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Predictive Model of Disability Related Outcomes of Pulmonary Rehabilitationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159198-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Predictive Model of Disability Related Outcomes of Pulmonary Rehabilitation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hassanein, Salwa, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kaiser Permanente</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Division of Research, Cleveland, OH, 44120, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">salwaewis@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.S. Gittner, Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Cleveland, OH; G. Narsavage, School of Nursing, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) programs improve functional status, exercise performance, and quality of life and decrease dyspnea, in individuals with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The study determined in an adult population with COPD the known contextual factors, resources, and barriers that can be identified on initial assessment to predict consistent attendance (PR dose effect) and disability-related outcomes experienced during PR programs. Conceptual Framework: Stuifbergen's Conceptual Model of QOL for People with Disabling Conditions (1995) was used to guide this retrospective record analysis using a descriptive predictive design. Method: Records of community dwelling adults with COPD who completed the PR program at a Midwestern Medical Center from 2000 to 2005 were included. Sample: There were 32 males and 72 females, mean age of 59.9 (SD=19.10), a mean FEV1 of 46.45% predicted (SD=20.1), and a mean FVC % predicted of 67.61(SD=16.61), FEV1/FVC % mean ratio was 51.15% predicted (SD=18.17), and mean RV was 150.66% predicted (SD= 67.01), indicating a population with moderate to severe obstructive lung disease. All were retired or unemployed, and 99% were on oxygen during exercise. Results: Independent variables of current smoking (Beta= -.36); male gender (Beta = .19); not having Emphysema (Beta = -.27); FVC% (Beta =.32), and number of selected co-morbidities (Beta =-.20) were significant predictors of attendance at (dose of) PR. PR dose predicted disability-related outcomes of metabolic level (Beta =.31) and dyspnea (Beta =.26) in the last PR session. The PR program acted as a mediator between predictors of age, BMI, activity level, numbers of selected co-morbidities and outcomes. Conclusion: The findings support the availability of information on factors that predict attendance at a PR program, the negative effects of current smoking, and that PR attendance (dose effect) mediates improvements in metabolic level and mental status. Nurses should assess patients for risk for PR non-attendance and address characteristics of time and perception of value that can be changed; smoking cessation could become a requirement before initiating activity in a PR program, and PR outcome measures should capture dyspnea and functional status.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:47:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:47:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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