2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159200
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age and Gender Related Differences in Postoperative Pain Management
Abstract:
Age and Gender Related Differences in Postoperative Pain Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Herrick, Linda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Rochester, MN, 55992, USA
Postoperative pain management remains a challenge despite years of research and national guidelines. Clinical trials have explored the effectiveness of pharmacologic and complementary therapies, yet pain levels remain above acceptable levels for some patients. Much of this research has focused on individual therapies without attention to specific populations. This study used a conceptual framework including pharmacologic and complementary interventions, pain as an outcome, and patient characteristics such as age, gender and type of surgery. This prospective study of 980 postoperative patients investigated patterns in pain ratings, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, and survey responses to better understand effects of standard clinical care. Relationships between pain ratings, morphine equivalencies, and survey items, gender and age were investigated using regression analysis. Satisfaction with pain management did not correlate well with the pain levels; however items asking how pain affected activity, emotions, and appetite performed better. Statistically significant patterns emerged related to gender and age in use of medication and pain ratings. Older patients used less medication and reported statistically lower pain levels. There were also significant differences on survey items indicating special needs based on age and gender, controlling for pain levels. Women reported that pain levels affected their emotions significantly more than men controlling for pain levels, while older patients reported that they were less satisfied with the amount of information they received than younger patients. These findings have implications for meeting the needs of these populations postoperatively that have not been addressed by national guidelines. While pain has been addressed, there appear to be some implications for special consideration related to age and gender. There are also implications for further research related to age, gender, and postoperative pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge and Gender Related Differences in Postoperative Pain Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159200-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Age and Gender Related Differences in Postoperative Pain Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Herrick, Linda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Rochester, MN, 55992, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">herri028@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Postoperative pain management remains a challenge despite years of research and national guidelines. Clinical trials have explored the effectiveness of pharmacologic and complementary therapies, yet pain levels remain above acceptable levels for some patients. Much of this research has focused on individual therapies without attention to specific populations. This study used a conceptual framework including pharmacologic and complementary interventions, pain as an outcome, and patient characteristics such as age, gender and type of surgery. This prospective study of 980 postoperative patients investigated patterns in pain ratings, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, and survey responses to better understand effects of standard clinical care. Relationships between pain ratings, morphine equivalencies, and survey items, gender and age were investigated using regression analysis. Satisfaction with pain management did not correlate well with the pain levels; however items asking how pain affected activity, emotions, and appetite performed better. Statistically significant patterns emerged related to gender and age in use of medication and pain ratings. Older patients used less medication and reported statistically lower pain levels. There were also significant differences on survey items indicating special needs based on age and gender, controlling for pain levels. Women reported that pain levels affected their emotions significantly more than men controlling for pain levels, while older patients reported that they were less satisfied with the amount of information they received than younger patients. These findings have implications for meeting the needs of these populations postoperatively that have not been addressed by national guidelines. While pain has been addressed, there appear to be some implications for special consideration related to age and gender. There are also implications for further research related to age, gender, and postoperative pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:47:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:47:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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