2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159202
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women Who Did Not Succeed in Work-Based Welfare
Abstract:
Women Who Did Not Succeed in Work-Based Welfare
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hildebrandt, Eugenie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Contact Address:Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Co-Authors:C. Boonto, Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the work-based welfare reform program, created dramatic changes in the lives of single mothers living in poverty. It replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). TANF requires adults with dependent children to work to receive cash welfare benefits, and has a 5-year lifetime limit for cash assistance. The workfare program focuses on “job readiness,” generally prepares women for entry-level jobs, and provides limited cash support and limited services for this vulnerable population. Within this population there are disparities in income and education associated with occurrence of illness, disabilities, and decreased access to health care and social services. The purpose of this study was to describe the lives of women who were unable to sustain involvement with work-based welfare. A multi-methodological design and snowball sampling were used to gather qualitative and quantitative cross-sectional data from 31 urban women. Instruments were a demographic form, an interview guide, and the General Well-being Schedule from the U.S. Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and entered into software to facilitate analysis. Narrative analysis, and thematic coding were done. The study population had higher levels of severe and moderate distress than the Reference Standards for the general US population. Data suggest 90% of women who exited the TANF workfare program early were unable to cope with the structure or expectations of the program because of system and personal barriers. The major perceived system barriers were limited flexibility and scope of the program, decentralized services that decreased access, and caseworker unresponsiveness or insensitivity. The perceived personal barriers were personal and family health problems, substance misuse, limited resources, lack of social support, unstable relationships, violence, abuse and significant family responsibilities. Implications for practice are a need to focus on broader, more creative solutions to help impoverished working women stay healthy and manage the stresses in their lives. Policy that address these obstacles would serve as blueprints for achieving Healthy People 2010 goals for the nation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen Who Did Not Succeed in Work-Based Welfareen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159202-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women Who Did Not Succeed in Work-Based Welfare</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hildebrandt, Eugenie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hbrandt@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Boonto, Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the work-based welfare reform program, created dramatic changes in the lives of single mothers living in poverty. It replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). TANF requires adults with dependent children to work to receive cash welfare benefits, and has a 5-year lifetime limit for cash assistance. The workfare program focuses on &amp;#8220;job readiness,&amp;#8221; generally prepares women for entry-level jobs, and provides limited cash support and limited services for this vulnerable population. Within this population there are disparities in income and education associated with occurrence of illness, disabilities, and decreased access to health care and social services. The purpose of this study was to describe the lives of women who were unable to sustain involvement with work-based welfare. A multi-methodological design and snowball sampling were used to gather qualitative and quantitative cross-sectional data from 31 urban women. Instruments were a demographic form, an interview guide, and the General Well-being Schedule from the U.S. Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and entered into software to facilitate analysis. Narrative analysis, and thematic coding were done. The study population had higher levels of severe and moderate distress than the Reference Standards for the general US population. Data suggest 90% of women who exited the TANF workfare program early were unable to cope with the structure or expectations of the program because of system and personal barriers. The major perceived system barriers were limited flexibility and scope of the program, decentralized services that decreased access, and caseworker unresponsiveness or insensitivity. The perceived personal barriers were personal and family health problems, substance misuse, limited resources, lack of social support, unstable relationships, violence, abuse and significant family responsibilities. Implications for practice are a need to focus on broader, more creative solutions to help impoverished working women stay healthy and manage the stresses in their lives. Policy that address these obstacles would serve as blueprints for achieving Healthy People 2010 goals for the nation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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