Assessing Oral Physiological Changes Associated With Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159205
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Oral Physiological Changes Associated With Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients
Abstract:
Assessing Oral Physiological Changes Associated With Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hsueh, Yu-shan
P.I. Institution Name:Chang Jung Christian University
Contact Address:nursing, 13F No.365 Dafong 2nd Road, Shan-Min District, Kaohsiung, 80777, Taiwan
Co-Authors:L.W. Suen, nursing, Chang Jung University, Tainan, TAIWAN
Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Taiwan for the past 24 years. In 2005, 37,222 people (26.8% of total deaths) died from malignant tumors. Among these, head and neck cancers were the 6th leading cause of death in Taiwan and claimed 2874 lives. Most head and neck cancer patients receive radiation therapy to the region and often as a result suffer from side effects such as xerostomia and dental cavities. These common side effects can have a great impact on the patients' quality of life, and severe symptoms may last a lifetime. The purpose of this longitudinal study is to assess physiological changes in the oral cavity environment during and after radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. The investigator will examine xerostomia, ability to open mouth, condition of oral mucus membrane, and salivary gland secretion in these patients. Forty patients from two hospital cancer clinics will be recruited. The inclusion criteria are those age 18 and older, suffering from head and neck area malignant tumors, and have not yet received any dose of radiation therapy. Those with salivary gland surgery will be excluded from this study. The investigator will assess the oral mucus membrane of each subject and collect saliva a total of 5 times before, after, and during radiotherapy. Each saliva sample will be analyzed for saliva flow rate (cc/minute), pH, electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium) and concentration of streptococcus mutans. To identify and test the concentration of streptococcus mutans, saliva will be extracted for DNA in order to perform real-time polymerase chain reaction (Real-time PCR) analysis. The data collection is still in process. The knowledge generated from this study will help head and neck patients develop strategies to improve their oral health and quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Oral Physiological Changes Associated With Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159205-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Oral Physiological Changes Associated With Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hsueh, Yu-shan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chang Jung Christian University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">nursing, 13F No.365 Dafong 2nd Road, Shan-Min District, Kaohsiung, 80777, Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kiwibird@ms25.hinet.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.W. Suen, nursing, Chang Jung University, Tainan, TAIWAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Taiwan for the past 24 years. In 2005, 37,222 people (26.8% of total deaths) died from malignant tumors. Among these, head and neck cancers were the 6th leading cause of death in Taiwan and claimed 2874 lives. Most head and neck cancer patients receive radiation therapy to the region and often as a result suffer from side effects such as xerostomia and dental cavities. These common side effects can have a great impact on the patients' quality of life, and severe symptoms may last a lifetime. The purpose of this longitudinal study is to assess physiological changes in the oral cavity environment during and after radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients. The investigator will examine xerostomia, ability to open mouth, condition of oral mucus membrane, and salivary gland secretion in these patients. Forty patients from two hospital cancer clinics will be recruited. The inclusion criteria are those age 18 and older, suffering from head and neck area malignant tumors, and have not yet received any dose of radiation therapy. Those with salivary gland surgery will be excluded from this study. The investigator will assess the oral mucus membrane of each subject and collect saliva a total of 5 times before, after, and during radiotherapy. Each saliva sample will be analyzed for saliva flow rate (cc/minute), pH, electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium) and concentration of streptococcus mutans. To identify and test the concentration of streptococcus mutans, saliva will be extracted for DNA in order to perform real-time polymerase chain reaction (Real-time PCR) analysis. The data collection is still in process. The knowledge generated from this study will help head and neck patients develop strategies to improve their oral health and quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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