Comparison of Central Venous Catheter and Peripheral Vein Samples of Antibiotics in Children With Cystic Fibrosis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159207
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Central Venous Catheter and Peripheral Vein Samples of Antibiotics in Children With Cystic Fibrosis
Abstract:
Comparison of Central Venous Catheter and Peripheral Vein Samples of Antibiotics in Children With Cystic Fibrosis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Jamerson, Patricia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:St. Louis Children's Hospital
Contact Address:PL-25, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA
Co-Authors:K. Schlechte, B. Witzig, and J. Huntman, St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO; K. Wilson, , Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO
Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients frequently require systemic antibiotic therapy with high potential for toxicity. Common practice is to obtain blood for drug concentration analysis from peripheral sites even though access may be difficult and many children with CF have existing indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs). Empirical data supporting this practice are scant and the findings are inconsistent. Most studies have been done with adults; many were conducted in the home setting using a variety of procedures and have had small sample sizes making application or decisions about best practice difficult. The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of vancomycin and tobramycin blood concentrations obtained from peripheral sites to levels obtained from indwelling CVCs in children with CF. Children with CF between the ages of 2 and 18 who were inpatients, had a functional indwelling central venous catheter, and had tobramycin or vancomycin drug concentration analyses ordered, were invited to participate. Following consent/assent, 50 paired (central-peripheral) blood antibiotic levels were obtained within 5 minutes of each other, according to hospital policy by trained nurses. The order in which the samples were obtained was randomly assigned. A CAP-accredited and CLIA-certified laboratory performed all drug concentrations per standard processes. Data were collected, stored, and analyzed using SPSS 11.0. The 50 paired specimens (38 tobramycin, 12 vancomycin) were highly correlated (r &#61; 0.97, p&#61;<0.001), with no statistically significant differences (t&#61; 1.18: p&#61; 0.25) between the drug levels drawn peripherally as compared to those drawn from CVCs. These results suggest that CVCs can be used to obtain reliable tobramycin and vancomycin antibiotic levels, eliminating the stress and discomfort of peripheral blood draws. Funded by Nu Chi Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Society & St. Louis Children&#8217;s Hospital.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Central Venous Catheter and Peripheral Vein Samples of Antibiotics in Children With Cystic Fibrosisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159207-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Central Venous Catheter and Peripheral Vein Samples of Antibiotics in Children With Cystic Fibrosis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jamerson, Patricia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Louis Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PL-25, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">paj3987@bjc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Schlechte, B. Witzig, and J. Huntman, St. Louis Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO; K. Wilson, , Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients frequently require systemic antibiotic therapy with high potential for toxicity. Common practice is to obtain blood for drug concentration analysis from peripheral sites even though access may be difficult and many children with CF have existing indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs). Empirical data supporting this practice are scant and the findings are inconsistent. Most studies have been done with adults; many were conducted in the home setting using a variety of procedures and have had small sample sizes making application or decisions about best practice difficult. The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of vancomycin and tobramycin blood concentrations obtained from peripheral sites to levels obtained from indwelling CVCs in children with CF. Children with CF between the ages of 2 and 18 who were inpatients, had a functional indwelling central venous catheter, and had tobramycin or vancomycin drug concentration analyses ordered, were invited to participate. Following consent/assent, 50 paired (central-peripheral) blood antibiotic levels were obtained within 5 minutes of each other, according to hospital policy by trained nurses. The order in which the samples were obtained was randomly assigned. A CAP-accredited and CLIA-certified laboratory performed all drug concentrations per standard processes. Data were collected, stored, and analyzed using SPSS 11.0. The 50 paired specimens (38 tobramycin, 12 vancomycin) were highly correlated (r &amp;#61; 0.97, p&amp;#61;&lt;0.001), with no statistically significant differences (t&amp;#61; 1.18: p&amp;#61; 0.25) between the drug levels drawn peripherally as compared to those drawn from CVCs. These results suggest that CVCs can be used to obtain reliable tobramycin and vancomycin antibiotic levels, eliminating the stress and discomfort of peripheral blood draws. Funded by Nu Chi Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Society &amp; St. Louis Children&amp;#8217;s Hospital.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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