Acculturation and Its Effect on the Health of Immigrant Mexicans: An Integrative Review

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159208
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acculturation and Its Effect on the Health of Immigrant Mexicans: An Integrative Review
Abstract:
Acculturation and Its Effect on the Health of Immigrant Mexicans: An Integrative Review
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Johnson, Catherine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Contact Address:, New Carlisle, OH, 45344, USA
This study describes the results of the integrative review of cultural research studies examining the effect of acculturation on the health of Mexican women immigrants and emphasizes the need for accurate measurement of acculturation when conducting cultural studies. Acculturation is a term used to describe the process of systematic cultural change within a particular individual or group as they interact directly with another culture. A variety of measurement tools of acculturation have been developed that describe the extent to which the minority or foreign culture incorporates the language, habits, values and standards of the dominant culture. This integrative review conducted a search using primarily PubMed, CINAHL and ISI Web of Knowledge databases using the key words acculturation, Mexican, female, research. One hundred and seven studies were found. Screening of all studies was completed using the following criteria for relevance: use of multivariate approach of measuring acculturation and Mexican female immigrants prominent in sample. Data analysis of the primary source documents involved a constant comparison methodology involving data reduction, data display, data comparison, conclusion drawing and verification. Unified and integrative conclusions were drawn regarding the impact of acculturation on the health and well-being of Mexican women who immigrate to the United States. Findings suggest that for Mexican women immigrants acculturation does have an impact on health risks for a variety of conditions. Overall acculturation has a paradoxical direct and inverse relationship with health outcomes. Low acculturation is associated with improved health outcomes. Cultural "protective factors" were identified as a possible etiology of the low risk experienced by low acculturated women. Increased acculturation does have the positive affect of increased self esteem and increased physical activity for Mexican women immigrants to the United States. Unique patterns of parenting, especially related to diet and decision making as well as self care practices were related to differing levels of acculturation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcculturation and Its Effect on the Health of Immigrant Mexicans: An Integrative Reviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159208-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Acculturation and Its Effect on the Health of Immigrant Mexicans: An Integrative Review</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Catherine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, New Carlisle, OH, 45344, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">catherine.johnson@wright.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study describes the results of the integrative review of cultural research studies examining the effect of acculturation on the health of Mexican women immigrants and emphasizes the need for accurate measurement of acculturation when conducting cultural studies. Acculturation is a term used to describe the process of systematic cultural change within a particular individual or group as they interact directly with another culture. A variety of measurement tools of acculturation have been developed that describe the extent to which the minority or foreign culture incorporates the language, habits, values and standards of the dominant culture. This integrative review conducted a search using primarily PubMed, CINAHL and ISI Web of Knowledge databases using the key words acculturation, Mexican, female, research. One hundred and seven studies were found. Screening of all studies was completed using the following criteria for relevance: use of multivariate approach of measuring acculturation and Mexican female immigrants prominent in sample. Data analysis of the primary source documents involved a constant comparison methodology involving data reduction, data display, data comparison, conclusion drawing and verification. Unified and integrative conclusions were drawn regarding the impact of acculturation on the health and well-being of Mexican women who immigrate to the United States. Findings suggest that for Mexican women immigrants acculturation does have an impact on health risks for a variety of conditions. Overall acculturation has a paradoxical direct and inverse relationship with health outcomes. Low acculturation is associated with improved health outcomes. Cultural &quot;protective factors&quot; were identified as a possible etiology of the low risk experienced by low acculturated women. Increased acculturation does have the positive affect of increased self esteem and increased physical activity for Mexican women immigrants to the United States. Unique patterns of parenting, especially related to diet and decision making as well as self care practices were related to differing levels of acculturation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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