2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159209
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) Essential Credentialing Issues
Abstract:
Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) Essential Credentialing Issues
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Jordan, Lorraine, CRNA, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:AANA
Contact Address:, Park Ridge, IL, 60068, USA
Co-Authors:S.K. Tunajek, Practice, AANA, Park Ridge, IL
Introduction: Accrediting standard setting organizations are investigating the different processes of authorization for patient care services provided by CRNAs and Advanced Practice Nurses. To address the questions related to authorization to clinical practice and knowledge of the process, an e-mail survey was developed and sent to CRNAs. Methods: In January 2006, a wide web-based survey was developed and tested. Questions were constructed to collect information regarding the method by which CRNAs are authorized to practice (i.e., credentialed) in their primary work setting. Recertified and certified AANA members with an e-mail address were contacted and asked to complete the survey. Results: A response rate of 14.7% was achieved. A significant number (70%) of CRNAs were authorized to practice by the medical staff. Twenty-one percent (21%) of the respondents were authorized to practice by another source (RAPAS). Thirty-six percent (36%) of the RAPAS described authorization through medical staff as being "probably not difficult or not difficult." Conclusions: The respondents' profile is similar to the AANA membership profile offering cautious confidence in reflecting the members' input. Generalization of the survey results to practicing CRNAs must be cautioned. Regardless of the source of authorization, the distribution of the respondents' primary working setting is similar to the AANA membership. Recognizing these findings as being one source of input, the results revealed 21% of the CRNAs authorized to practice through RAPAS, 73% indicated it would probably be difficulty to obtain medical staff authorization. Most importantly, 90% of the RAPAS identified that the loss of CRNA practice privileges would significantly impact or cause a loss of anesthesia services in the area. The numerous sources of authorization compound the challenge of educating the "other sources" to one universal credentialing process for CRNAs. Therefore, implementing accreditation standards to only authorized the practice for CRNAs by the medical staff requires a great amount of forethought. The potential loss of anesthesia services could be significant if only one authorization process method is recognized by accrediting agencies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCertified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) Essential Credentialing Issuesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159209-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) Essential Credentialing Issues</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jordan, Lorraine, CRNA, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">AANA</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Park Ridge, IL, 60068, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ljordan@aana.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.K. Tunajek, Practice, AANA, Park Ridge, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Accrediting standard setting organizations are investigating the different processes of authorization for patient care services provided by CRNAs and Advanced Practice Nurses. To address the questions related to authorization to clinical practice and knowledge of the process, an e-mail survey was developed and sent to CRNAs. Methods: In January 2006, a wide web-based survey was developed and tested. Questions were constructed to collect information regarding the method by which CRNAs are authorized to practice (i.e., credentialed) in their primary work setting. Recertified and certified AANA members with an e-mail address were contacted and asked to complete the survey. Results: A response rate of 14.7% was achieved. A significant number (70%) of CRNAs were authorized to practice by the medical staff. Twenty-one percent (21%) of the respondents were authorized to practice by another source (RAPAS). Thirty-six percent (36%) of the RAPAS described authorization through medical staff as being &quot;probably not difficult or not difficult.&quot; Conclusions: The respondents' profile is similar to the AANA membership profile offering cautious confidence in reflecting the members' input. Generalization of the survey results to practicing CRNAs must be cautioned. Regardless of the source of authorization, the distribution of the respondents' primary working setting is similar to the AANA membership. Recognizing these findings as being one source of input, the results revealed 21% of the CRNAs authorized to practice through RAPAS, 73% indicated it would probably be difficulty to obtain medical staff authorization. Most importantly, 90% of the RAPAS identified that the loss of CRNA practice privileges would significantly impact or cause a loss of anesthesia services in the area. The numerous sources of authorization compound the challenge of educating the &quot;other sources&quot; to one universal credentialing process for CRNAs. Therefore, implementing accreditation standards to only authorized the practice for CRNAs by the medical staff requires a great amount of forethought. The potential loss of anesthesia services could be significant if only one authorization process method is recognized by accrediting agencies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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